Not currently on display at the V&A

Armchair

ca. 1905 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Ernest Gimson founded furniture workshops at Daneway House, Sapperton in Gloucestershire in the early 1900s. This armchair was designed by Gimson in about 1905. It was made by either Edward Gardiner, who was employed by Gimson as a chair-maker and wood-turner, or by Gimson himself. The chair is an example of the influential Arts and Crafts furniture produced in the Cotswolds in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

The chair is made of yew and has a rush seat. The distinctive beaded ornament of the stretchers, uprights and back spindles, is known as bobbin turning: so-called because the shape resembles the bobbins used in some forms of textile weaving. The use of bobbin-turned elements, popular in seventeenth-century British furniture, and the relatively simple form of the chair reflect Gimson’s interest in traditional crafts and manufacturing techniques.

This particular chair was acquired from Norman Jewson, a former assistant to Gimson and the husband of Ernest Barnsley’s eldest daughter, Mary.


object details
Category
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Chair made of turned yew elements with rush seat
Dimensions
  • Approximate height: 125cm
  • Approximate width: 56cm
  • Approximate depth: 48.5cm
Style
Gallery Label
17 ARMCHAIR About 1905 The revival of bobbin turning, produced by hand on a pole-lathe, was an important aspect of Arts and Crafts furniture making. This chair belonged to Norman Jewson, one of Gimson's architectural assistants at Sapperton. Gimson also designed a version with flat arms rather than turned ones. [46 words] Yew, bobbin turned, with rush seat Designed by Ernest Gimson (born in Leicester, 1864, died in Sapperton, 1919); made at the Daneway House workshops, Sapperton, Gloucestershire Museum no. Circ. 231-1960(01/10/2008)
Summary
Ernest Gimson founded furniture workshops at Daneway House, Sapperton in Gloucestershire in the early 1900s. This armchair was designed by Gimson in about 1905. It was made by either Edward Gardiner, who was employed by Gimson as a chair-maker and wood-turner, or by Gimson himself. The chair is an example of the influential Arts and Crafts furniture produced in the Cotswolds in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.



The chair is made of yew and has a rush seat. The distinctive beaded ornament of the stretchers, uprights and back spindles, is known as bobbin turning: so-called because the shape resembles the bobbins used in some forms of textile weaving. The use of bobbin-turned elements, popular in seventeenth-century British furniture, and the relatively simple form of the chair reflect Gimson’s interest in traditional crafts and manufacturing techniques.



This particular chair was acquired from Norman Jewson, a former assistant to Gimson and the husband of Ernest Barnsley’s eldest daughter, Mary.
Collection
Accession Number
CIRC.231-1960

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record createdNovember 14, 2005
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