Not currently on display at the V&A

Ring

1972 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Gilian Packard was born in 1938 and studied at Kingston School of Art, the Central School and the Royal College of Art. She established herself as one of the leading jewellers of the 1960s, winning many major jewellery awards and became the first woman to become a Freeman of the Goldsmiths Company in a professional capacity. She died at Aldburgh, Suffolk in 1997.

She was particularly noted for her innovative yet elegant rings, described by the jewellery historian Peter Hinks as 'deft and wearable' . This example was part of a series of rings using interlocking forms which she made in the 1970s. She also pioneered the use of interlocking wedding and engagement rings. Jewellers in the 1960s and 70s found many interesting and innovative ways of setting diamonds – encouraged by the competitions run by the De Beers diamond consortium.

She also promoted modern jewellery through her work as a teacher, as Professor of Jewellery and Silversmithing at the Glasgow School of Art and then at the Sir John Cass Department of Silversmithing, Jewellery and Allied Arts of London's Guildhall University.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Gold set with a diamond
Brief Description
Gold ring, set with a marquise diamond, by Gilian E. Packard, London, 1972.
Physical Description
18 carat gold ring, set with a marquise diamond (approx. 40 carat).
Dimensions
  • Height: 2.3cm
  • Width: 2.3cm
  • Depth: 1cm
Marks and Inscriptions
(London hallmarks for 1972)
Object history
Purchased from the artist for the cost of the materials. This ring and M.24-1985 were designed and made in the early 1970s as part of a series of rings using interlocking curved forms.



Necklace sold by Dix Noonan and Webb

JEWELLERY, WATCHES AND OBJECTS OF VERTU (5 SEPTEMBER 2017), lot 125
Summary
Gilian Packard was born in 1938 and studied at Kingston School of Art, the Central School and the Royal College of Art. She established herself as one of the leading jewellers of the 1960s, winning many major jewellery awards and became the first woman to become a Freeman of the Goldsmiths Company in a professional capacity. She died at Aldburgh, Suffolk in 1997.



She was particularly noted for her innovative yet elegant rings, described by the jewellery historian Peter Hinks as 'deft and wearable' . This example was part of a series of rings using interlocking forms which she made in the 1970s. She also pioneered the use of interlocking wedding and engagement rings. Jewellers in the 1960s and 70s found many interesting and innovative ways of setting diamonds – encouraged by the competitions run by the De Beers diamond consortium.



She also promoted modern jewellery through her work as a teacher, as Professor of Jewellery and Silversmithing at the Glasgow School of Art and then at the Sir John Cass Department of Silversmithing, Jewellery and Allied Arts of London's Guildhall University.
Bibliographic References
  • Obituary by Arline M Fisch in Craftnotes from CRAFTS JAN/FEB 1998
  • Sophia Tobin Women and the Goldsmiths Company, The Goldsmiths Review 2016-17, pp. 10-11
Collection
Accession Number
M.23-1985

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record createdNovember 2, 2005
Record URL