Spray thumbnail 1
Spray thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Spray

ca. 1851 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

By the mid 19th century naturalism in jewellery had come to include movement. Flexible or coiled stalks (tremblers) made the flowers and fruit quiver and glitter when the wearer moved.

The larger floral pieces created a glamorous display on grand occasions but could also be dismantled into smaller, more wearable elements, such as brooches.

Floral jewellery made a touching gift of love or friendship. It could also convey symbolic messages. In The Language of Flowers, first published by Mrs Burke in 1856, the lily of the valley signified a return of happiness, while the convolvulus could have a number of meanings – from the bonds of love to repose or even extinguished hope.


Object details
Categories
Object type
Materials and techniques
Brilliant-cut diamonds, silver
Brief description
Flower spray ornament, diamonds set in silver, Western Europe, about 1851
Physical description
Ornament in the form of a floral spray made up of three convolvulus flowers with seven rose leaves, and at the end of the spray a small bow. Brilliant-cut diamonds set in silver.
Dimensions
  • Height: 5.7cm
  • Width: 4.9cm
  • Depth: 1.7cm
Credit line
Cory Bequest
Subjects depicted
Summary
By the mid 19th century naturalism in jewellery had come to include movement. Flexible or coiled stalks (tremblers) made the flowers and fruit quiver and glitter when the wearer moved.



The larger floral pieces created a glamorous display on grand occasions but could also be dismantled into smaller, more wearable elements, such as brooches.



Floral jewellery made a touching gift of love or friendship. It could also convey symbolic messages. In The Language of Flowers, first published by Mrs Burke in 1856, the lily of the valley signified a return of happiness, while the convolvulus could have a number of meanings – from the bonds of love to repose or even extinguished hope.
Collection
Accession number
M.140C-1951

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Record createdAugust 17, 2005
Record URL
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