Earring thumbnail 1
Earring thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Earring

ca. 1860 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Elements of the design and the colours used in these earrings are Indian but the construction could be European. In terms of the design, the central stones are not of equal size and shape but this would matter less in an Indian market. The discrepancy could also be explained if the earrings were adapted from another piece of jewellery.

Visitors to the Great Exhibition held in London in 1851 greatly admired the Indian jewellery. Its rich appearance was achieved by combining enamelled gold with dense settings of pearls and thinly cut coloured stones.

By the 1860s, as European commercial jewellery lost its appeal in artistic circles, jewellery from the Middle East and India became an important influence. In London, the Art Journal encouraged an appreciation of jewellery from countries such as Syria and Palestine. In Paris, jewellery made in the Moroccan style reflected the French engagement with North Africa.


object details
Category
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Earring
  • Earring
Materials and Techniques
Enamelled gold, brilliant-cut diamonds, rubies, pearls
Brief Description
Pair of earrings, enamelled gold set with diamonds, rubies, and pearls,India or England, about 1860
Physical Description
Pair of earrings, enamelled gold set with brilliant-cut diamonds, rubies, and pearls. Probably adapted from pendants to match the necklace M.136-1951
Credit line
Cory Bequest
Object history
Probably adapted from pendants to match the necklace M.136-1951
Summary
Elements of the design and the colours used in these earrings are Indian but the construction could be European. In terms of the design, the central stones are not of equal size and shape but this would matter less in an Indian market. The discrepancy could also be explained if the earrings were adapted from another piece of jewellery.



Visitors to the Great Exhibition held in London in 1851 greatly admired the Indian jewellery. Its rich appearance was achieved by combining enamelled gold with dense settings of pearls and thinly cut coloured stones.



By the 1860s, as European commercial jewellery lost its appeal in artistic circles, jewellery from the Middle East and India became an important influence. In London, the Art Journal encouraged an appreciation of jewellery from countries such as Syria and Palestine. In Paris, jewellery made in the Moroccan style reflected the French engagement with North Africa.
Collection
Accession Number
M.136A&B-1951

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record createdAugust 17, 2005
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