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Quatchi

Olympic Mascot
2007 (manufactured)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The first Olympic mascot 'Waldi' a Daschund dog appeared at the 1972 Munich Olympic Games. Mascots are used to communicate the Olympic spirit to the general public, especially youth and children. They are usually a character or animal native to the country where the games are being held and showcase the history and culture unique to the host city. In more recent years it has been common to have more than one mascot. This could be to ensure gender equity but has undoubtedly increased the merchandising potential of the Olympic mascot.

Quatchi the Sasquatch is one of three mascots used at the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games. A well-known figure of Aboriginal legend along the Pacific According to designers VANOC the Sasquatch "reminds us of the mystery and wonder associated with the great Canadian wilderness".

The other two mascots are Miga the Seabear and Sumi a Chimera. The inspiration for all three was drawn from legends of First Nation Canadian Aborginal culture but other influences include the Olympic and Paralympic movements, modern animation styles and the culture and wildlife of British Columbia and Canada. The three mascots have been featured in a series of videos in which they are joined by a virtual friend called Mukmuk who is a rare marmot from the mountains of Vancouver Island.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Fabric, plastic and card
Brief Description
Plush figure made for the 2010 Vancouver games made in 2007 by Northern Gifts in China
Physical Description
Quatchi is a Sasquatch with a brown fur body, brown stripy plush legs and cord feet with the Olympic logo embroidered on his left leg. He has a brown plastic nose and stitched black eyes and mouth. He wears blue furry earmuffs with a white headband. Original merchandising tags are still attached and there is a plastic hook on his head.
Dimensions
  • Height: 345mm
  • Width: 250mm
  • Depth: 110mm
Production typeMass produced
Marks and Inscriptions
'vancouver 2010 / Official Licensed Merchandise / Quatchi'
Subject depicted
Association
Summary
The first Olympic mascot 'Waldi' a Daschund dog appeared at the 1972 Munich Olympic Games. Mascots are used to communicate the Olympic spirit to the general public, especially youth and children. They are usually a character or animal native to the country where the games are being held and showcase the history and culture unique to the host city. In more recent years it has been common to have more than one mascot. This could be to ensure gender equity but has undoubtedly increased the merchandising potential of the Olympic mascot.



Quatchi the Sasquatch is one of three mascots used at the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games. A well-known figure of Aboriginal legend along the Pacific According to designers VANOC the Sasquatch "reminds us of the mystery and wonder associated with the great Canadian wilderness".



The other two mascots are Miga the Seabear and Sumi a Chimera. The inspiration for all three was drawn from legends of First Nation Canadian Aborginal culture but other influences include the Olympic and Paralympic movements, modern animation styles and the culture and wildlife of British Columbia and Canada. The three mascots have been featured in a series of videos in which they are joined by a virtual friend called Mukmuk who is a rare marmot from the mountains of Vancouver Island.
Collection
Accession Number
B.151-2009

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record createdJanuary 26, 2010
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