Earrings thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Earrings

ca. 1835-ca. 1840 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

These earrings have been made by pressing the gold into the required shape using a steel die stamping machine.

By the 1850s the jewellery trade had been transformed by consumer demand and technological innovation. Traditional techniques such as casting, chasing and engraving continued in high fashion pieces, but newer industrial methods created cheaper products for a mass market.

Flatted gold, rolled through machinery to a very thin sheet, could be stamped to make multiple standard components. Through the use of stamped collets, even the setting of gemstones required less handwork.

The expansion of the jewellery trade in Britain also benefited from the legalisation of three lower standards of gold alloys in 1854.


object details
Category
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Earring
  • Earring
Materials and Techniques
Stamped and enamelled gold, foiled topaz
Brief Description
Pair of earrings, stamped and enamelled gold set with pink foiled topaz, possibly made in Switzerland, about 1835-40
Physical Description
Pair of earrings, stamped and enamelled gold set with pink foiled topaz.
Marks and Inscriptions
(Unidentified marks on the earring loops.)
Credit line
Given by Dame Joan Evans
Object history
Part of a parure comprising of a necklace (M.36-1962), pendant-brooch (M.36A-1962) and pair of earrings (M.36B&C-1962), set with pink foiled crystals. Struck with two unidentified marks.
Summary
These earrings have been made by pressing the gold into the required shape using a steel die stamping machine.



By the 1850s the jewellery trade had been transformed by consumer demand and technological innovation. Traditional techniques such as casting, chasing and engraving continued in high fashion pieces, but newer industrial methods created cheaper products for a mass market.



Flatted gold, rolled through machinery to a very thin sheet, could be stamped to make multiple standard components. Through the use of stamped collets, even the setting of gemstones required less handwork.



The expansion of the jewellery trade in Britain also benefited from the legalisation of three lower standards of gold alloys in 1854.
Associated Objects
Collection
Accession Number
M.36B&C-1962

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record createdAugust 16, 2005
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