Wreath thumbnail 1
Wreath thumbnail 2
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Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Wreath

ca. 1815 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This wreath tiara has hinged sections to make it easy to wear. The restrained and symetrical decorative scheme, with a central cameo portrait inspired by antique carved gems, shows the influence of the neo-classical style. The Greeks and Romans wore wreaths of gold but with the spread of christianity and the waning of the Roman Empire wreaths disappeared from the vocabulary of jewellery and did not become fashionable again until the late 18th century in Europe.


object details
Category
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Enamelled gold, diamonds, pearls and paste cameo
Brief Description
Wreath of enamelled gold, set with diamonds, pearls and a paste cameo, western Europe, ca. 1815.
Physical Description
Wreath of enamelled gold, set with diamonds, pearls and a paste cameo; in hinged sections rising to a peak in the centre.
Dimensions
  • Height: 7.2cm
  • Width: 30.3cm
  • Depth: 2cm
The wreath was measured as previously displayed, flat on the surface.
Credit line
Bequeathed by Mr John George Joicey
Subjects depicted
Summary
This wreath tiara has hinged sections to make it easy to wear. The restrained and symetrical decorative scheme, with a central cameo portrait inspired by antique carved gems, shows the influence of the neo-classical style. The Greeks and Romans wore wreaths of gold but with the spread of christianity and the waning of the Roman Empire wreaths disappeared from the vocabulary of jewellery and did not become fashionable again until the late 18th century in Europe.
Collection
Accession Number
M.293-1919

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record createdAugust 8, 2005
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