Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 125, Edwin and Susan Davies Gallery

Plate

ca. 1875-1885 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
Traditional blue and white ceramics from China and Japan were enthusiastically collected by adherents of Aestheticism. More generally, although Japanese images were popular, the genuine artefact or image was often misinterpreted or adopted at several removes from the original. The design of this transfer-printed pattern includes an owl, a bird not immediately associated with Japan. However, the asymmetrical arrangement was generally recognised as in Japanese taste. The design name, as marked in the reverse of the plate, is 'Andalusia'. The irrelevance of name to pattern was common in Victorian ceramics; indeed, relevance was extremely uncommon.

People
Brown-Westhead, Moore & Co. operated at the Cauldon Place works, Hanley, establised in about 1802 by Job Ridgway. By the 1870s the company was one of the largest in the area, with over 1000 employees. It made a wide variety of table and toilet wares in earthenware and porcelain, and ornamental Parian, eggshell porcelain and majolica wares, and it supplied both the British and Russian Royal families.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
White earthenware, printed
Brief Description
Plate, made by Brown Westead Moore & Co, Cauldon Place, Hanley, Staffordshire, England, about 1875-85
Physical Description
This white earthenware plate has transfer-printed decoration in blue with a pattern of fans and flowers with views of mountains, lakes, trees, and a fisherman, embellished with chrysanthemums and leaves in 'Japanese' style
Dimensions
  • Diameter: 23.0cm
Marks and Inscriptions
Marked 'BWM & C ANDALUSIA' with shield and badge surmounted by a crown 'S' printed in blue; 'BROWN WESTHEAD MOORE & CO 5' impressed
Gallery Label
  • British Galleries: This plate was highly fashionable in style, although it was inexpensively made for everyday use. The pattern was influenced by traditional blue and white ceramics from China and Japan and shows a mixture of Aesthetic design, with its asymmetric composition and motifs such as an owl, fans and Japanese chrysanthemums.(27/03/2003)
  • Plate Made by Brown Westead Moore & Co, Cauldon Place, Hanley, Staffordshire, England, about 1875-85 Marks: 'BWM & C Andalusia S' printed, 'Brown Westehad Moore & Co 5' impressed Earthenware, transfer-printed C.216-1984(23/05/2008)
Object history
Made by Brown-Westhead, Moore & Co., Hanley, Staffordshire

Made in England
Subjects depicted
Summary
Object Type
Traditional blue and white ceramics from China and Japan were enthusiastically collected by adherents of Aestheticism. More generally, although Japanese images were popular, the genuine artefact or image was often misinterpreted or adopted at several removes from the original. The design of this transfer-printed pattern includes an owl, a bird not immediately associated with Japan. However, the asymmetrical arrangement was generally recognised as in Japanese taste. The design name, as marked in the reverse of the plate, is 'Andalusia'. The irrelevance of name to pattern was common in Victorian ceramics; indeed, relevance was extremely uncommon.

People
Brown-Westhead, Moore & Co. operated at the Cauldon Place works, Hanley, establised in about 1802 by Job Ridgway. By the 1870s the company was one of the largest in the area, with over 1000 employees. It made a wide variety of table and toilet wares in earthenware and porcelain, and ornamental Parian, eggshell porcelain and majolica wares, and it supplied both the British and Russian Royal families.
Collection
Accession Number
C.216-1984

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record createdJuly 1, 1999
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