Not currently on display at the V&A

Amenophis

Furnishing Fabric
1913 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

In 1912 the artist and critic Roger Fry wrote to Bernard Shaw 'I am intending to start a workshop for decorative and applied art'; a year later he founded the Omega Workshops. Fry was an advocate of the couturier Paul Poiret's Ecole Martine, a decorating workshop consisting of a group of untrained teenage girls who produced lively colourful 'primitive' drawings of flowers and vegetation, used as a basis for printed textiles and wallpapers. Although Fry shared Poiret's approach to design, Omega employed fine artists working in Fauvist and Cubist styles, rather than untrained girls. Omega's main areas of activity were furniture and ceramics, however, textiles played a key role from the outset and the launch collection included printed and woven furnishing fabrics, carpets and hand-painted silk scarves. 'Amenophis' was one of six linens printed at the Maromme Printworks near Rouen in France, using an undivulged special technical process aimed as preserving the 'freedom and spontaneity of the original drawing'.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Printed linen
Brief Description
Furnishing fabric, 'Amenophis', printed linen, designed by Omega Workshops in Great Britain, printed by Besselièvre, France, 1913.
Physical Description
Printed linen furnishing fabric.
Dimensions
  • Width: 211mm
  • Length: 359mm
Credit line
Given anonymously
Object history
Registered File number 1995/495.
Summary
In 1912 the artist and critic Roger Fry wrote to Bernard Shaw 'I am intending to start a workshop for decorative and applied art'; a year later he founded the Omega Workshops. Fry was an advocate of the couturier Paul Poiret's Ecole Martine, a decorating workshop consisting of a group of untrained teenage girls who produced lively colourful 'primitive' drawings of flowers and vegetation, used as a basis for printed textiles and wallpapers. Although Fry shared Poiret's approach to design, Omega employed fine artists working in Fauvist and Cubist styles, rather than untrained girls. Omega's main areas of activity were furniture and ceramics, however, textiles played a key role from the outset and the launch collection included printed and woven furnishing fabrics, carpets and hand-painted silk scarves. 'Amenophis' was one of six linens printed at the Maromme Printworks near Rouen in France, using an undivulged special technical process aimed as preserving the 'freedom and spontaneity of the original drawing'.
Other Number
C.20648 - previous number
Collection
Accession Number
T.290-1995

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdAugust 2, 2005
Record URL