Devonshire Villas

Dolls' House
1900 (made)
Devonshire Villas thumbnail 1
Devonshire Villas thumbnail 2
+86
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Temporary Exhibition, room 38
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This house is not a child's plaything. It is a replica of a real house that existed in Kilburn, North London, which was later destroyed. It was made in 1900 for Mr Samuel Loebl, who lived in the house at the time, as a present for his daughter, Cecy. Both his daughter and his grand-daughter played with the house. His grandaughter donated the house to the museum in 1972. It is decorated and furnished in the very latest style for the time and many of the features, such as the fitted bathroom and the double sink in the kitchen, were very modern. The bathroom walls have "sanitary" wallpaper, specially coated to be washable and still a very new idea at the time. Cecy made the carpets, lampshades and upholstery in the bedroom and drawing room. The nursery would still have been the domain of the children and their nurse. It is well stocked with toys and the frieze and pictures provide visual stimulation. There is also the latest in technology - a telephone. The house was exhibited at a Toy Fair in Frankfurt in 1925.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Wood, glass, metals
Brief Description
Dolls' house known as Devonshire Villas made in England in about 1900
Physical Description
The front is a replica of the donor's mother's house, No 3 Devonshire Villas, High Road, Kilburn in North West London (the house it was modelled on no longer exists). The house contains six rooms plus a conservatory and a hallway. The conservatory is separated from the drawing room by a beadwork curtain. The hallway has a large stained glass panel. The furnishings are very much in the Art Nouveau style of the time. The kitchen and nursery are both particularly well-appointed rooms.
Dimensions
  • Height: 202cm
  • Including conservatory width: 163.5cm
  • Including steps at front depth: 70cm
  • Excluding steps at front depth: 61cm
  • Conservatory on right hand side height: 38.5cm
  • Conservatory on right hand side width: 16.5cm
  • Conservatory on right hand side depth: 42cm
Styles
Production typeUnique
Gallery Label
This up to date home has a colourful nursery for the children on the top floor. It is a convincing record of an Edwardian home, including a fitted bathroom with washable ‘sanitary wallpaper’, and a telephone in the hall. The large kitchen is well-equipped for fancy dinner parties. This dolls’ house was made for Samuel Loebl as a present for his daughter Cecy. It was inspired by their real house, No.3 Devonshire Villas, in North West London. Samuel’s granddaughter Nora also played with it as a child, and gave it to the Museum in 1972. (2014)
Credit line
Given by Mrs. N. Rosenthal
Production
Reason For Production: Commission
Subjects depicted
Summary
This house is not a child's plaything. It is a replica of a real house that existed in Kilburn, North London, which was later destroyed. It was made in 1900 for Mr Samuel Loebl, who lived in the house at the time, as a present for his daughter, Cecy. Both his daughter and his grand-daughter played with the house. His grandaughter donated the house to the museum in 1972. It is decorated and furnished in the very latest style for the time and many of the features, such as the fitted bathroom and the double sink in the kitchen, were very modern. The bathroom walls have "sanitary" wallpaper, specially coated to be washable and still a very new idea at the time. Cecy made the carpets, lampshades and upholstery in the bedroom and drawing room. The nursery would still have been the domain of the children and their nurse. It is well stocked with toys and the frieze and pictures provide visual stimulation. There is also the latest in technology - a telephone. The house was exhibited at a Toy Fair in Frankfurt in 1925.
Collection
Accession Number
MISC.5-1972

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record createdMay 20, 2005
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