Daisy thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 125, Edwin and Susan Davies Gallery

Daisy

Tile
1862-1881 (made), ca. 1862 (designed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
Hand-painted tiles became a popular feature of artistic interiors from the 1860s onwards. Such tiles regularly appear in houses decorated in the Arts and Crafts style, and were used widely by exponents of vernacular architecture such as Richard Norman Shaw (1831-1912). The most common setting for such tiles was in and around the fireplace.

People
William Morris's love of medieval imagery is well known. In addition, however, he shared with many of his contemporaries a keen interest in vernacular British architecture and decorative art of the 17th and 18th centuries. This enthusiasm is demonstrated in his approach to tile making. This was carried out using a variation of the techniques that had previously been employed by the manufacturers of tin-glazed earthenware (delftware) tiles.

Materials & Making
Rather than painting decoration onto the raw glaze, as is normal practice in the production of tin-glazed earthenware, William Morris bought in already glazed and fired tile blanks from The Netherlands. These were subsequently decorated and fired in a kiln intended for stained glass. This led to various technical problems, and Morris & Co. tiles are often of variable quality. Perhaps because of this, Morris later switched production of his tile designs to The Netherlands. 'Daisy' was one of Morris's most popular patterns, and both British and Dutch versions of the design are known.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Hand-painted on tin-glazed earthenware
Brief Description
'Daisy' tile
Dimensions
  • Height: 13.0cm
  • Width: 13.0cm
  • Depth: 0.7cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 07/07/1999 by Terry
Gallery Label
British Galleries: This is one of Morris's first designs for tiles, sold by the Morris company from 1862. Tiles were the least expensive of all their products and they had a variety of uses in fireplaces, in furniture and on walls. Morris tiles were painted onto plain blanks produced by other firms and then fired in a stained-glass kiln.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Bequeathed by J. R. Holliday
Object history
Designed by William Morris (born in London, 1834, died there in 1896); produced by Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co., London; using a blank tile supplied from The Netherlands
Summary
Object Type
Hand-painted tiles became a popular feature of artistic interiors from the 1860s onwards. Such tiles regularly appear in houses decorated in the Arts and Crafts style, and were used widely by exponents of vernacular architecture such as Richard Norman Shaw (1831-1912). The most common setting for such tiles was in and around the fireplace.

People
William Morris's love of medieval imagery is well known. In addition, however, he shared with many of his contemporaries a keen interest in vernacular British architecture and decorative art of the 17th and 18th centuries. This enthusiasm is demonstrated in his approach to tile making. This was carried out using a variation of the techniques that had previously been employed by the manufacturers of tin-glazed earthenware (delftware) tiles.

Materials & Making
Rather than painting decoration onto the raw glaze, as is normal practice in the production of tin-glazed earthenware, William Morris bought in already glazed and fired tile blanks from The Netherlands. These were subsequently decorated and fired in a kiln intended for stained glass. This led to various technical problems, and Morris & Co. tiles are often of variable quality. Perhaps because of this, Morris later switched production of his tile designs to The Netherlands. 'Daisy' was one of Morris's most popular patterns, and both British and Dutch versions of the design are known.
Collection
Accession Number
C.58-1931

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdMay 26, 1999
Record URL