Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Necklace

ca. 1905 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Henry Wilson's jewellery is distinctive for its rich colour combinations worked in stones and enamel, and its sculptural qualities. Like many other Arts and Crafts designers, including C.R. Ashbee, Wilson trained originally as an architect. He became interested in metals in the early 1890s, and went on to teach at the Royal College of Art, publishing a practical manual Silverwork and Jewellery in 1903.

In the preface to the manual he encouraged the student to ‘feed his imagination on old work’ and his own attraction to historical themes can be seen in the overall form of this necklace.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Necklace
  • Pendant
Materials and Techniques
Gold, enamelled, opals, pearls, emeralds
Brief Description
Necklace, gold, set with opals, pearls and emeralds and decorated with enamel, designed by Henry Wilson, made at the workshop of Henry Wilson, London, about 1905
Physical Description
Necklace, gold, set with opals, pearls and emeralds and decorated with enamel; together with pendant medallion
Style
Object history
Formerly in the collection of the British Institute of Industrial Arts
Summary
Henry Wilson's jewellery is distinctive for its rich colour combinations worked in stones and enamel, and its sculptural qualities. Like many other Arts and Crafts designers, including C.R. Ashbee, Wilson trained originally as an architect. He became interested in metals in the early 1890s, and went on to teach at the Royal College of Art, publishing a practical manual Silverwork and Jewellery in 1903.



In the preface to the manual he encouraged the student to ‘feed his imagination on old work’ and his own attraction to historical themes can be seen in the overall form of this necklace.
Collection
Accession Number
CIRC.363&PART-1958

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record createdApril 7, 2005
Record URL