Not currently on display at the V&A

The Kashmir Gate, Delhi

Photograph
1860s (photographed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The Kashmiri gateway shown here was one of 14 entrances into the city of Shahjahanabad, the seventh of the seven historical cities of Delhi. It was built by the British in 1835, along with other bastions in the original wall built by Shah Jahan. It is one of only four surviving gateways.

This photograph shows the damage inflicted on the wall during the uprising of the Indian army in 1857 (or the 'Indian Mutiny' as it was called by the British). It was through this gateway that British soldiers entered Delhi and suppressed the uprising. Behind the gateway, the lantern and cross of St James's Church is just visible. This was the first church to be built by the British in Delhi.

The road which runs through the gateway leads to Kashmir, hence the name. The gateways and the walls which connected them enclosed the city of Shahjahanabad and were built between 1651 and 1658. The wall was about 8 metres high, 4 metres thick and about 5 kilometres long.

The British photographer Samuel Bourne lived and worked in India between 1862 and 1869. During this time he toured the Himalayas and travelled through the subcontinent, photographing its landscape, architecture and historical sites. He set up a studio in Simla with Charles Shepherd and sold his prints sold to an eager public both in India and Britain.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Albumen print from wet collodion glass negative
Brief Description
Photograph of the Kashmir Gate, Delhi, India, by Samuel Bourne, 1860s
Physical Description
The Kashmiri gateway was one of 14 entrances into the city of Shahjahanabad, the 7th city of the 7 historical cities of Delhi. It derives it’s name from the fact that the road which runs through it leads to Kashmir. The gateways and the walls which connected them enclosed the city of Shahjahanabad and were built between 1651-8. The wall was 27 feet high, 12 feet thick, and 3.8 miles long.



The Kashmiri gateway, was built by the British in 1835 along with other bastions in the original wall built by Shah Jahan. It is one of only 4 surviving gateways. This photograph shows the damage inflicted on the wall during the Indian ‘mutiny’ of 1857. It was through this gateway that British soldiers entered Delhi and suppressed the uprising.



In the photograph, behind the gateway, the lantern and cross of St James Church is just visible. This was the first church to be built by the British in Delhi.



Signature and negative number in bottom left hand side.
Dimensions
  • Photograph width: 29.2cm
  • Photograph height: 23.5cm
  • Mount width: 32.9cm
  • Mount height: 26.6cm
Marks and Inscriptions
The Kashmiri gateway was one of 14 entrances into the city of Shahjahanabad, the 7th city Signature and negative number in bottom left hand side.
Object history
The photograph was initially part of the photographic collection held in the National Art Library. The markings on the mount are an indication of the history of the object, its movement through the museum and the way in which it is categorised.

The mount is white and has evidence of handwritten text across the top: IIbd.

On the right hand side there is a label with: A.in. Delhi

Bottom left: Label from Bourne catalogue, with 'Delhi' handwritten next to it.

On the back is a handwritten note which states the Bourne catalogue no and says 'Borrowed 29/4/70'.
Production
Bourne visited Delhi in 1863, as mentioned in his writings. He is also likely to have made subsequent visits in 1864 and 1866 though this is not recorded in his writings. This print would have been made before March 1867.
Subject depicted
Places Depicted
Summary
The Kashmiri gateway shown here was one of 14 entrances into the city of Shahjahanabad, the seventh of the seven historical cities of Delhi. It was built by the British in 1835, along with other bastions in the original wall built by Shah Jahan. It is one of only four surviving gateways.



This photograph shows the damage inflicted on the wall during the uprising of the Indian army in 1857 (or the 'Indian Mutiny' as it was called by the British). It was through this gateway that British soldiers entered Delhi and suppressed the uprising. Behind the gateway, the lantern and cross of St James's Church is just visible. This was the first church to be built by the British in Delhi.



The road which runs through the gateway leads to Kashmir, hence the name. The gateways and the walls which connected them enclosed the city of Shahjahanabad and were built between 1651 and 1658. The wall was about 8 metres high, 4 metres thick and about 5 kilometres long.



The British photographer Samuel Bourne lived and worked in India between 1862 and 1869. During this time he toured the Himalayas and travelled through the subcontinent, photographing its landscape, architecture and historical sites. He set up a studio in Simla with Charles Shepherd and sold his prints sold to an eager public both in India and Britain.
Bibliographic Reference
Bourne, S, Photography in the East, The British Journal of Photography, September 1 1863, pg 345.
Other Number
1357 - Negative number
Collection
Accession Number
53201

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record createdDecember 23, 2004
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