Pendant thumbnail 1
Pendant thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Pendant

1906 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

John Paul Cooper received particular praise at the 1906 Arts and Crafts Exhibition, when the Studio magazine singled out his jewellery for its sculptural qualities and for its originality at a time when other exhibitors' work appeared rather formulaic. The shimmering colours and rounded cabochon-cut stones are typical features of Arts and Crafts jewellery, as are the plain bezels and the hand-worked silver. Cooper's work was often although by no means exclusively figurative, and he favoured spiritual and symbolic subjects. He was fascinated also by the magical and spiritual associations of precious metals and stones. He had trained initially as an architect and worked in the practice of J. D. Sedding, before turning to metalwork and jewellery. By 1906 when this pendant was made, when Cooper was head of the Metalwork Department at the Birmingham Municipal School of Art.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Hand-worked silver and gold with rubies, aquamarines, sapphires, opals and chrysoprases
Brief Description
Pendant of gold and silver, set with rubies, chrysoprases, sapphires, aquamarines and opals, designed and made by John Paul Cooper, Birmingham, 1906.
Physical Description
The pendant consists of a madonna and child within a jewelled niche, which hangs within an circular wire frame decorated with stars. A further small circular pendant and drop hang below, while above a dove descends between the two chains that connect the suspension loop.
Dimensions
  • Height: 14cm
  • Width: 7cm
Style
Marks and Inscriptions
Unmarked
Credit line
Formerly in the collection of Charles and Lavinia Handley-Read.
Production
A sketch of the pendant appears in Coopers first stockbook, dated December 20th 1906.
Subjects depicted
Summary
John Paul Cooper received particular praise at the 1906 Arts and Crafts Exhibition, when the Studio magazine singled out his jewellery for its sculptural qualities and for its originality at a time when other exhibitors' work appeared rather formulaic. The shimmering colours and rounded cabochon-cut stones are typical features of Arts and Crafts jewellery, as are the plain bezels and the hand-worked silver. Cooper's work was often although by no means exclusively figurative, and he favoured spiritual and symbolic subjects. He was fascinated also by the magical and spiritual associations of precious metals and stones. He had trained initially as an architect and worked in the practice of J. D. Sedding, before turning to metalwork and jewellery. By 1906 when this pendant was made, when Cooper was head of the Metalwork Department at the Birmingham Municipal School of Art.
Collection
Accession Number
M.30-1972

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record createdOctober 22, 2004
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