Recreation of the costume worn by Louis XIV as Apollo thumbnail 1
Recreation of the costume worn by Louis XIV as Apollo thumbnail 2
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Recreation of the costume worn by Louis XIV as Apollo

Theatre Costume
1969 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

At the 17th century French court, ballet was performed not by professionals, but by the aristocrats themselves, including the king, Louis XIV (1638-1715), who was passionately fond of dancing. In 1653, he appeared in Ballet de la nuit as Apollo, god of the sun in Greek mythology, who puts to flight darkness and evil. From his appearance in this ballet came his sobriquet "The Sun King" - as the sun gave light and life to the earth, ran the symbolism, so the young King cast light and life over France and his subjects.

This stunning costume is a reconstruction of Louis's costume as Apollo, devised by David Walker for Ballet For All, the Royal Ballet's educational demonstration group. Walker had great knowledge of costume and would thoroughly research historical dress, but he also understood that it had to be translated into contemporary (1960s) terms. The costume recreates the impression of sumptuous richness while using 20th century materials, including gold lurex and, for the motifs, plastic furniture decorations. Under modern stage lighting the effect was like a burst of sunshine, so that modern audiences could understand why the original made such an indelible impact on 17th century spectators.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 10 parts.
(Some alternative part names are also shown below)
  • Theatre Costume
  • Dance Costume
  • Theatre Costume
  • Dance Costume
  • Tunic
  • Theatre Costume
  • Dance Costume
  • Breeches
  • Theatre Costume
  • Dance Costume
  • Cloak
  • Theatre Costume
  • Dance Costume
  • Tights
  • Theatre Costume
  • Dance Costume
  • Shoe
  • Theatre Costume
  • Dance Costume
  • Shoe
  • Theatre Costume
  • Dance Costume
  • Rosette
  • Theatre Costume
  • Dance Costume
  • Rosette
  • Theatre Costume
  • Dance Costume
  • Headdress
Brief Description
Recreation of the costume worn by Louis XIV as Apollo in Ballet Royal de la nuit (1653) used in the production The Twelfth Rose, Ballet For All, Swan Theatre, Worcester, 1969. Designed by David Walker
Dimensions
  • Height: 200cm
  • Width: 85cm
  • Depth: 75cm
  • Part g length: 144cm
  • Part g width: 29cm
  • Part g weight: 0.6kg
Whole costume including headdress measured on mannequin
Credit line
Given by the Royal Academy of Dance
Object history
Recreation of the costume worn by Louis XIV as the Sun in the ballet Ballet Royal de la nuit, 1653. The costume was used in the production The Twelfth Rose, performed by Ballet For All (part of the Royal Ballet) at the Swan Theatre, Worcester, September 1969. The choreography for the reconstruction was by Mary Skeaping, the music was by Camberfort, and the words were by Benserade (translated by Fergus Early). The costumes were designed by David Walker.
Summary
At the 17th century French court, ballet was performed not by professionals, but by the aristocrats themselves, including the king, Louis XIV (1638-1715), who was passionately fond of dancing. In 1653, he appeared in Ballet de la nuit as Apollo, god of the sun in Greek mythology, who puts to flight darkness and evil. From his appearance in this ballet came his sobriquet "The Sun King" - as the sun gave light and life to the earth, ran the symbolism, so the young King cast light and life over France and his subjects.



This stunning costume is a reconstruction of Louis's costume as Apollo, devised by David Walker for Ballet For All, the Royal Ballet's educational demonstration group. Walker had great knowledge of costume and would thoroughly research historical dress, but he also understood that it had to be translated into contemporary (1960s) terms. The costume recreates the impression of sumptuous richness while using 20th century materials, including gold lurex and, for the motifs, plastic furniture decorations. Under modern stage lighting the effect was like a burst of sunshine, so that modern audiences could understand why the original made such an indelible impact on 17th century spectators.
Collection
Accession Number
S.1657&A to I-1982

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record createdSeptember 16, 2004
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