Image of Gallery in South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level D , Case R, Shelf 1, Box C

Vitruvius Britannicus, or The British Architect, Volume I

Print
1715 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

Engraving print on paper


Object details
Categories
Object type
Materials and techniques
printer's ink, paper, engraving
Brief description
From Vitruvius Britannicus by Colen Campbell: Wanstead House, Essex. Plate 22 of Volume I. Engraving, London, 1715
Physical description
Engraving print on paper
Dimensions
  • Height: 9.875in (Note: Taken from Departmental Circulation Register 1967)
  • Weight: 14.875in (Note: Taken from Departmental Circulation Register 1967)
Marks and inscriptions
Ca: Campbell Inv: et Delin. (Lettered)
Gallery label
Anonymous engraver after Colen Campbell (1676-1729) First design for the west elevation of Wanstead House, Essex. Etching and engraving from Vitruvius Britannicus, Vol I, 1717 Wanstead, designed by Colen Campbell from 1713 and built by 1715 for Sir Richard Child was the purest, most classical house of its day and was also one of the biggest. Campbell deliberately put this print of it near the start of Vitruvius Britannicus, just after the prints of Inigo Jones's and John Webb's buildings (also shown in this exhibition). He evidently intended to present the house as an exemplar of what new architecture should be, that is neo-Palladian. Espcially important were the horizontal emphasis and detail of the facade and the columned portico, matched inside by a temple-like saloon of the same dimensions. When built, the block was made shorter, and lower symmetrical wings added. Close to London, Wanstead quickly became a goal for sightseers and its design was soon being imitated all over England. It was demolished in 1824, althought the park survives. Circ.86-1967
Credit line
Acquired from B. Weinreb Ltd., London in 1967.
Place depicted
Bibliographic reference
Taken from Departmental Circulation Register 1967
Collection
Accession number
CIRC.86-1967

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Record createdJune 30, 2009
Record URL
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