A Woman's Work Is Never Done thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C , Case MB2A, Shelf DR109

A Woman's Work Is Never Done

Poster
1976 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The Women's Liberation Movement saw itself as the 'True Left' and poster makers extended this ideology to the production process. The See Red Women's Poster Collective (1974-1989) was a notable example of co-operative and non-hierarchical work methods. Their output focused on the domestic issues of women's lives. The 'split woman' represents women who had to work a double shift in employment and in the home, and were undervalued in both. The poster protests against the situation, but the woman herself appears strong and capable.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Screenprint in red ink
Brief Description
Poster by the See Red Women's Poster Collective entitled 'A Woman's Work Is Never Done'. UK, 1976.
Physical Description
Red and white image of a 'split woman', divided between her responsibilities as an employee on a production line and her domestic responsibilities as a wife and mother.
Dimensions
  • Height: 52.9cm
  • Width: 69.5cm
Marks and Inscriptions
  • A Womans Work Is Never Done (printed in red and white)
  • SEERED (printed in white on red on baby's leg, lower left)
Credit line
Gift of the American Friends of the V&A; Gift to the American Friends by Leslie, Judith and Gabri Schreyer and Alice Schreyer Batko
Subjects depicted
Place Depicted
Summary
The Women's Liberation Movement saw itself as the 'True Left' and poster makers extended this ideology to the production process. The See Red Women's Poster Collective (1974-1989) was a notable example of co-operative and non-hierarchical work methods. Their output focused on the domestic issues of women's lives. The 'split woman' represents women who had to work a double shift in employment and in the home, and were undervalued in both. The poster protests against the situation, but the woman herself appears strong and capable.
Other Number
LS.1321 - Leslie Schreyer Loan Number
Collection
Accession Number
E.1714-2004

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record createdAugust 23, 2004
Record URL