Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C , Case 1B, Box LS2

Je participe...

Poster
1968 (Designed and printed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

From a young age, French children master their native language by copying out the various tenses of verbs. This shared cultural experience is here used by French art students for the cause of protesting President Charles de Gaulle's May 1968 proposal for citizen's participation. A hand is shown writing the verb "to participate" in its single and plural forms. The message of dissent comes in the final copied line (third person plural) where the hand conjugates instead a form of the verb "to profit". The radical statement is their belief that all of one's good intentioned participation with goverment edicts will result in someone else's gain.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Screenprint
Brief Description
"Je participe" Parisian student protest poster. France, 1968.
Physical Description
Hand conjugating the various forms of the verb "to participate." (The thrust of the message is the final line of text: the third person plural is a form of the verb "to profit").
Dimensions
  • Height: 64.7cm
  • Width: 50cm
Marks and Inscriptions
  • je participe/ tu participes/ il participe/ nous participons/ vous participez (pinted in the style of lower case cursive handwriting)
  • ils profitent (underlined)
Credit line
Gift of the American Friends of the V&A; Gift to the American Friends by Leslie, Judith and Gabri Schreyer and Alice Schreyer Batko
Production
published in Paris, the second week of July, 1968
Subjects depicted
Place Depicted
Summary
From a young age, French children master their native language by copying out the various tenses of verbs. This shared cultural experience is here used by French art students for the cause of protesting President Charles de Gaulle's May 1968 proposal for citizen's participation. A hand is shown writing the verb "to participate" in its single and plural forms. The message of dissent comes in the final copied line (third person plural) where the hand conjugates instead a form of the verb "to profit". The radical statement is their belief that all of one's good intentioned participation with goverment edicts will result in someone else's gain.
Bibliographic Reference
'Texts and Posters by Atelier Populaire: Posters from the Revolution Paris, May 1968' by Atelier Populaire. London: Dobson, 1969.
Other Number
LS.1378 - Leslie Schreyer Loan Number
Collection
Accession Number
E.673-2004

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record createdAugust 12, 2004
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