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Painting

  • Place of origin:

    Murshidabad (made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1770 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Painted in opaque watercolour and gold on paper

  • Museum number:

    IS.14-1955

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

Physical description

Painting in opaque watercolour and gold on paper, two ladies with a girl pay their respects to a yogi (ascetic) who is seated on a deer-skin and in front of his riverside ashram (hermitage). A yogini (female ascetic) is seated next to him on the ground. A noblewoman arrives carrying her offerings. She has embarked from a maur-pankhi (peacock-shaped pinnace), which is partly visible on the river.

The composition has the influence of European watercolour technique, this is particularly affecting the central tree in the picture and the stacks of cloud above. Another interesting aspect of the picture is the roof of the hut, which has tiles rather than thatch.

Place of Origin

Murshidabad (made)

Date

ca. 1770 (made)

Artist/maker

Unknown

Materials and Techniques

Painted in opaque watercolour and gold on paper

Dimensions

Height: 309 mm maximum, Width: 423 mm maximum, Height: 271 mm image within innermost painted borders, Width: 390 mm image within innermost painted borders

Object history note

IS.10 to 18-1954 were purchased from Maggs Bros., London W1.

Descriptive line

Painting, ladies visiting yogis, opaque watercolour and gold on paper, Murshidabad, ca. 1770

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

p.48
Arts of Bengal : the heritage of Bangladesh and eastern India : an exhibition organized by the Whitechapel Art Gallery in collaboration with the Victoria and Albert Museum : 9 November-30 December 1979, Whitechapel Art Gallery ..., 12 January-17 February 1980, Manchester City Art Gallery ... . [London]: Whitechapel Art Gallery, [1979] Number: 085488047X (pbk.) :

Production Note

The central tree in the picutre owes its treatment to the influence of European watercolour technique.

Materials

Opaque watercolour; Paper; Paint; Gold

Techniques

Painted

Subjects depicted

Ashram; River; Ascetics; Hinduism; Skin

Categories

Paintings; Religion; Bonita Trust Indian Paintings Cataloguing Project

Collection

South & South East Asia Collection

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