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Not currently on display at the V&A

Doll With Cradle and Layette

Artist/Maker

'Princess Daisy' was created to raise money to help the poor. The project was the idea of Henriette Amélie Jeanette (Amy) Grothe Twiss, of Hilversum in the Netherlands, who ordered an English baby doll by post, and set about having a lavish layette of clothes and equipment made for her. Mrs Grothe Twiss then exhibited Princess Daisy and her belongings at the Amsterdam International Exhibition of 1895, where she was awarded a gold medal and raised money for the poor by means of a state-run lottery. As nobody came forward to claim the prize, the doll and her belongings were then sold to someone who wished to do something similar in England. They were eventually given to the Duchess of York (later Queen Mary) for her young daughter, Princess Mary, but were lent to the museum for a number of years before being formally presented as a gift by Princess Mary in 1965.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 48 parts.
(Some alternative part names are also shown below)
  • Doll
  • Cradle
  • Sheet
  • Undersheet
  • Pillowcase
  • Pillow
  • Quilt
  • Cushion
  • Christening Cushion
  • Cover
  • Christening Cover
  • Layette Basket
  • Kettle
  • Component
  • Vessel
  • Amulet
  • Cross
  • Photograph
  • Photograph
  • Photograph
  • Photograph
  • Necklace
  • Christening Present
  • Bracelet
  • Christening Present
  • Brooch
  • Christening Present
  • Mug
  • Christening Present
  • Rattle
  • Christening Present
  • Fork
  • Christening Present
  • Porridge Bowl
  • Christening Present
  • Spoon
  • Christening Present
  • Pap Boat
  • Christening Present
  • Sheet
  • Sheet
  • Sheet
  • Undersheet
  • Undersheet
  • Undersheet
  • Pillowcase
  • Pillowcase
  • Pillowcase
  • Lid
  • Component
  • Burner
  • Component
  • Lid
  • Component
  • Stand
  • Spoon
  • Christening Present
  • Spoon
  • Christening Present
  • Stand
  • Component
  • Booklet
  • Powder Box
  • Powder Puff
  • Hairbrush
  • Pin Cushion
  • Box
  • Christening Present
Materials and Techniques
Wax and textile
Brief Description
Dressed wax doll, Princess Daisy, made in England in the early 1890s with a cradle and full layette
Physical Description
Wax doll dressed as a baby in a cradle with accompanying equipment including frocks, nightdresses, jackets, mittens, hoods, petticoats, diapers, vests, socks, sheets, pillowcases, feeding utensils and jewellery.
Object history
'Princess Daisy' was created to raise money to help the poor. The project was the idea of Henriette Amélie Jeanette (Amy) Grothe Twiss, of Hilversum in the Netherlands, who ordered an English baby doll by post, and set about having a lavish layette of clothes and equipment made for her. Mrs Grothe Twiss then exhibited Princess Daisy and her belongings at the Amsterdam International Exhibition of 1895, where she was awarded a gold medal and raised money for the poor by means of a state-run lottery. As nobody came forward to claim the prize, the doll and her belongings were then sold to someone who wished to do something similar in England. They were eventually given to the Duchess of York (later Queen Mary) for her young daughter, Princess Mary, but were lent to the museum for a number of years before being formally presented as a gift by Princess Mary in 1965.
Subjects depicted
Summary
'Princess Daisy' was created to raise money to help the poor. The project was the idea of Henriette Amélie Jeanette (Amy) Grothe Twiss, of Hilversum in the Netherlands, who ordered an English baby doll by post, and set about having a lavish layette of clothes and equipment made for her. Mrs Grothe Twiss then exhibited Princess Daisy and her belongings at the Amsterdam International Exhibition of 1895, where she was awarded a gold medal and raised money for the poor by means of a state-run lottery. As nobody came forward to claim the prize, the doll and her belongings were then sold to someone who wished to do something similar in England. They were eventually given to the Duchess of York (later Queen Mary) for her young daughter, Princess Mary, but were lent to the museum for a number of years before being formally presented as a gift by Princess Mary in 1965.
Collection
Accession Number
MISC.88 to 90-1965

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record createdMay 4, 2004
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