Not currently on display at the V&A

Edward Hamlyn Adams of Middleton Hall

Relief
ca. 1821-1850 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

Edward Hamlyn Adams of Middleton Hall is shown in profile facing to the left. He wears a black frock coat and a black stock.

The sitter is Edward Hamlyn Adams of Middleton Hall, previously of Jamaica. He was High Sheriff of Carmarthenshire in 1831.

During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, low relief portraits in wax became popular in Britain and they were often exhibited at the Royal Academy, the Society of Artists and elsewhere. Waxes were used in a similar way to prints and medals, in order to disseminate the image of the sitter, or, like miniature paintings or silhouettes as portable mementoes.

Object details

Category
Object type
TitleEdward Hamlyn Adams of Middleton Hall
Materials and techniques
Wax in giltwood frame
Brief description
Relief, Wax, English, by David Morrison, about 1821-1850
Physical description
The profile relief of Edward Hamlyn Adams is shown facing to the left. He wears a black frock coat and a black stock. The wax is mounted on black glass.
Dimensions
  • Framed height: 27cm
  • Framed width: 24cm
Marks and inscriptions
  • 'D. MORRISON, ABADAM FAMILY FROM / MIDDLETON HALL / CARMARTHENSHIRE'. (Handwritten on a label on the back.)
  • 'ABADAM FAMILY / from / MIDDLETON HALL / CARMARTHENSHIRE / co / -/-'. (Handwritten on a label (possibly by Bate) underneath the trade card.)
Credit line
From the Mary Bate Collection
Object history
From the Mary Bate Collection, ex. loan 8. Bought from Philip Bate for £50
Historical context
The subject is Edward Hamlyn Adams of Middleton Hall, previously of Jamaica. He was High Sheriff of Carmarthenshire in 1831. There is a bust by E.H. Behnes in the Carmarthen Museum.
Summary
Edward Hamlyn Adams of Middleton Hall is shown in profile facing to the left. He wears a black frock coat and a black stock.

The sitter is Edward Hamlyn Adams of Middleton Hall, previously of Jamaica. He was High Sheriff of Carmarthenshire in 1831.

During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, low relief portraits in wax became popular in Britain and they were often exhibited at the Royal Academy, the Society of Artists and elsewhere. Waxes were used in a similar way to prints and medals, in order to disseminate the image of the sitter, or, like miniature paintings or silhouettes as portable mementoes.
Bibliographic references
  • Pyke, E.J. A Biographical Dictionary of Wax Modellers, Oxford, 1973, pp. 94-5.
  • Gunnis, R. Dictionary of British Sculptors, London 1951, p. 265.
Collection
Accession number
A.17-1970

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Record createdMarch 17, 2004
Record URL
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