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Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Silver, Room 67, The Whiteley Galleries

Cup

1863-1864 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Colour is introduced onto this drinking cup through the inclusion of semi-precious stones, and a band of cameos and gems. Despite their use here, Burges claimed to dislike faceted gems, preferring the medieval style of cabochons (unfaceted stones encased in boxes). He described those as follows: 'these strips of jewels, and enamels and filigree are the great key to the decorations of jewellery of the Middle Ages'.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Silver, parcel-gilt, set with applied ornament and enamelled
Dimensions
  • Height: 12.00cm
  • Width: 11.00cm
  • Weight: 384.1g
Marks and Inscriptions
  • Maker: CH (Charles Hart for Joseph Hart and Son, date H, duty, sterling.) On nut: maker, sterling
  • Inscribed: OMNIS.MUNDI.CREATURA.QUASI. LIBER.ET.PICTURA.NOBIS.EST.ET.SPECULUM (on rim); I.N.MAA.ANO.DNI. MDCCCLXIII (round knob); NOSTRAE.VITAE.NOSTRAE.MORTIS.NOSTRI.STATUS.NOSTRAE.SORTIS.FIDELE. SIGNACULUM (round the bottom)
  • Letters on central medal: KRAKAN
Object history
Made for James Nicholson (Burges' patron)

Inscribed: OMNIS MUNDI CREATURA QUASI LIBER ET PICTURA NOBIS EST ET SPECULUM; I.N MAA ANO. DNI. MDCCCLXIII; NOSTRAE VITAE NOSTRAE MORTIS NOSTRI STATUS NOSTRAE SORTIS FIDELE SIGNACULUM ("This is a kind of book, picture or mirror of all the creatures of the world"; "A faithful expression of our life, our death, our status, our type/class"). Colour is introduced onto this drinking cup through the inclusion of semi-precious stones, and a band of cameos and gems. Despite their use here, Burges claimed to dislike facetted gems, preferring the medieval style of "cabochons" (unfacetted stones encased in boxes). He described those as follows: "these strips of jewels, and enamels and filigree are the great key to the decorations of jewellery of the Middle Ages".
Summary
Colour is introduced onto this drinking cup through the inclusion of semi-precious stones, and a band of cameos and gems. Despite their use here, Burges claimed to dislike faceted gems, preferring the medieval style of cabochons (unfaceted stones encased in boxes). He described those as follows: 'these strips of jewels, and enamels and filigree are the great key to the decorations of jewellery of the Middle Ages'.
Bibliographic Reference
Eric Turner An Introduction to English Silver from 1660, London, HMSO, 1985 p.32 ill. ISBN 0880450770
Collection
Accession Number
CIRC.858-1956

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record createdMarch 3, 2004
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