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Spoon

Spoon

  • Place of origin:

    Berlin (made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1908 (made)
    1902 (designed)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Velde, Henry van de, born 1863 - died 1957 (designer)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Silver

  • Museum number:

    M.31-1993

  • Gallery location:

    Silver, Room 67, The Whiteley Galleries, case 20

The design originated in a commission that the State of Weimar gave to van de Velde. It was for presentation to the Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar in 1902.

Henri Van de Velde studied painting at the Antwerp Academy, but in 1892 he decided to become a designer. He was greatly influenced by the writings of John Ruskin and William Morris. By 1898 he had founded his own studio and factory near Brussels. In 1900 he moved his office to Berlin. He was a prolific writer, and wrote many articles in which he stressed the importance of line in ornament. His early graphic designs are often completely abstract. His early metalwork designs also show great freedom and invention in the prevailing Art Nouveau style.

Place of Origin

Berlin (made)

Date

ca. 1908 (made)
1902 (designed)

Artist/maker

Velde, Henry van de, born 1863 - died 1957 (designer)

Materials and Techniques

Silver

Marks and inscriptions

left hand edge of stem: “925” denoting purity, German standard mark, crown, moon
no maker’s mark

Dimensions

Length: 22.5 cm, Width: 4.05 cm, Weight: 87.6 g

Object history note

The design originated in a commission from van de Velde by the State of Weimar for presentation to the Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar in 1902.
(Henry Van de Velde born Antwerp, 1863 - died Zurich, 1957)
Van de Velde initially studied painting at the Antwerp Academy, before deciding on a career as a designer in 1892. He was heavily influenced by the writings of John Ruskin and William Morris. By 1898, he had founded his own studio and factory near Brussels, moving his office to Berlin in 1900. A prolific writer, he stressed the importance of line in ornament in his many articles. His early graphic designs are often completely abstract and his early metalwork designs also display remarkable freedom and invention in the prevailing Art Nouveau style.

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Henry van de Velde, Ein europaischer Kunstler seiner Zeit, Klaus-Jurgen Sembach and Birgit Schulfe, Wienand Verlag, Cologne, 1992, p. 308.

Categories

Metalwork; Tableware & cutlery

Collection

Metalwork Collection

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