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Bell

Bell

  • Place of origin:

    London (made)

  • Date:

    1862-1863 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Barkentin & Slater (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Bronze, damascened in silver and silver gilt; the handle of cornelian

  • Museum number:

    289-1864

  • Gallery location:

    Metalware, Room 116, The Belinda Gentle Gallery, case 5

This bell was decorated by a technique known as 'damascening'. The term describes the inlaying of gold or silver into another metal (usually steel) and derives from countries including Syria (Damascus), Egypt, Turkey and Iran, where the technique was practiced on swords and gun barrels. It was mimicked in western Europe from the early 16th century and was later revived in the 1830s. The bell was made by Jes Barkentin (about 1800 to 1883) a Danish immigrant and his first partner George Slater. They described themselves as "sculptors, silver, gold, & bronze manufacturers & workers in damascened steel". Most English manufacturers, however, were unable to afford the expense of genuine damascening.

Physical description

Hand bell, bronze damascened with architectural ornaments in silver gilt and a circle of female figures in silver, the handle of cornelain and silver gilt.

Place of Origin

London (made)

Date

1862-1863 (made)

Artist/maker

Barkentin & Slater (maker)

Materials and Techniques

Bronze, damascened in silver and silver gilt; the handle of cornelian

Marks and inscriptions

Messrs. Barkentin & Slater

Dimensions

Diameter: 6.90 cm bowl, Height: 12.70 cm

Object history note

Acquisition RF: Barkentin & Slater
Purchase - £10 - 10s
Messrs. Barkentin & Slater

Jes Barkentin (about 1800 to 1883) was a Danish immigrant, whose first partner was George Slater. They described themselves as "sculptors, silver, gold, & bronze manufacturers & workers in damascened steel". Damascening, the technique of inlaying gold or silver into another metal (usually steel) was first revived in Europe in the 1830's. Most English manufacturers, however, were unable to afford the expense of genuine damascening and ignored the fashion.

Descriptive line

Bronze bell, damascened in silver and silver gilt, the handle of cornelian, London, 1862-63, made by Barkentin and Slater

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Jervis, Simon, High Victorian Design, Suffolk, The Boydell Press, 1938, p. 64 ill. ISBN. 0851151876

Materials

Bronze; Silver; Cornelian; Silver

Techniques

Damascening

Categories

Metalwork

Collection

Metalwork Collection

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