Augustin Loesch, Chancellor of the Duchy of Bavaria thumbnail 1
Augustin Loesch, Chancellor of the Duchy of Bavaria thumbnail 2
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images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Sculpture, Room 111, The Gilbert Bayes Gallery

Augustin Loesch, Chancellor of the Duchy of Bavaria

Medal
1526 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This is a lead medal, made by Friedrich Hagenauer in Germany in 1526.
Like many German sculptors, Hagenauer carved his models in wood. This accounts for the accuracy and linear clarity of his work. His medals frequently show the sitter’s head in profile with the shoulders turned frontally and the date sunk into the field of the medal. Many were later copied for wooden gaming pieces. The legend in Latin reads, ‘The image of Augustin Loesch of Hilkers, doctor of law, Chancellor of the Duchy of Bavaria’.
Hagenauer (1490-1500) was a German wood-carver and medallist. In accordance with his training as a wood-carver he prepared his models in boxwood or pearwood and then cast them in silver, bronze or lead. Hagenauer was active throughout the whole South German area and the Lower Rhine (main work output from the cities: Augsburg, Baden, Swabia, Bonn, Cologne, Munich). His models are very accurate and precise, and exact in the smallest detail. His patrons were fascinated by his models and treasured them as works of art, framed them and sometimes even coloured them. This is the reason also why so many have survived.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Lead, cast
Brief Description
Medal, lead, Augustin Loesch Chancellor of the Duchy of Bavaria, by Friedrich Hagenauer, Germany, 1526
Physical Description
Obverse only, bust of Augustin Loesch facing right, clean-shaven, wearing a low hat with upturned flaps, and a gown with a richly decorated collar.
Dimensions
  • Diameter: 7.1cm
  • Weight: 80.1g
Marks and Inscriptions
  • 'EFFIGIES.AVGVSTINI.LESCH.DE HILKERS . I . V. DOC . BAIO . DVCVM . CANCELLA' (Latin; Obverse)
  • 'M.D. - XXVI' (Date; In the field of the obverse)
Object history
Provenance: Tross. 140 medals and reliefs were purchased from M. Henri Tross of Paris for £500 by J.C. Robinson for the Museum in 1867.
Subjects depicted
Summary
This is a lead medal, made by Friedrich Hagenauer in Germany in 1526.

Like many German sculptors, Hagenauer carved his models in wood. This accounts for the accuracy and linear clarity of his work. His medals frequently show the sitter’s head in profile with the shoulders turned frontally and the date sunk into the field of the medal. Many were later copied for wooden gaming pieces. The legend in Latin reads, ‘The image of Augustin Loesch of Hilkers, doctor of law, Chancellor of the Duchy of Bavaria’.

Hagenauer (1490-1500) was a German wood-carver and medallist. In accordance with his training as a wood-carver he prepared his models in boxwood or pearwood and then cast them in silver, bronze or lead. Hagenauer was active throughout the whole South German area and the Lower Rhine (main work output from the cities: Augsburg, Baden, Swabia, Bonn, Cologne, Munich). His models are very accurate and precise, and exact in the smallest detail. His patrons were fascinated by his models and treasured them as works of art, framed them and sometimes even coloured them. This is the reason also why so many have survived.
Bibliographic References
  • Trusted, Marjorie. German Renaissance Medals: A Catalogue of the Collection in the Victoria and Albert Museum. London: Victoria & Albert Museum, 1990, p. 57
  • Inventory of Art Objects acquired in the Year 1867. Inventory of the Objects in the Art Division of the Museum at South Kensington, arranged According to the Dates of their Acquisition. Vol. 1. London: Printed by George E. Eyre and William Spottiswoode for H.M.S.O., 1868, p. 20
  • Scher, Stephen K, The Currency of fame: portrait medals of the Renaissance, New York, National Gallery of Art (U.S.), Frick Collection., 1994pp.228-230
Collection
Accession Number
150-1867

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record createdFebruary 27, 2004
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