Tile thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 122

Tile

1863-1870 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
Inlaid tiles (with decoration inlaid into their surface using contrasting coloured clays) were produced in large quantities from the mid-19th century. The principal market for the tiles was for churches, both new and restored. The majority were used on floors, but this was not always the case.

Manufacturers
The firm of William Godwin began production of encaustic tiles at Lugwardine near Hereford in 1852. Despite its mark, this tile was probably made at nearby Withington, where a second factory was established by the firm in 1863. Many of the tiles produced by the firm were based on medieval prototypes. Due to their authentic appearance, Godwin tiles were reputed to be favoured above those of other manufacturers by the architects George Gilbert Scott (1811-1878) and G.E Street (1824-1881) in their church restorations.

Places
This tile was part of a group removed from the Chapter House of Salisbury Cathedral in the late 1960s or early 1970s. They almost certainly date from Gilbert Scott's restoration of the cathedral, begun in 1863. The design is taken from medieval tiles used at Salisbury and elsewhere.
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object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Red earthenware, moulded and inlaid with buff slip
Brief Description
Encaustic tile
Dimensions
  • Width: 14cm
  • Depth: 14cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 18/01/1999 by sf
Marks and Inscriptions
Moulded on the back: 'GODWIN LUGWARDINE HEREFORD'
Gallery Label
British Galleries: FLOOR TILE AND DESIGN from a Medieval model
From about 1830 designers and manufacturers adopted Medieval Gothic styles and techniques widely for the architecture and furnishings of new and refurbished churches. Godwin & Co. made this tile with a heraldic bird motif which was copied from original Medieval tiles that had been found in Salisbury Cathedral and elsewhere. The architect Sir George Gilbert Scott (1811-1878) used these in his restoration of Salisbury Cathedral, started in 1863.(27/03/2003)
Object history
Made by the firm of William Godwin of Lugwardine Works, near Hereford

From the Chapter House, Salisbury Cathedral
Summary
Object Type
Inlaid tiles (with decoration inlaid into their surface using contrasting coloured clays) were produced in large quantities from the mid-19th century. The principal market for the tiles was for churches, both new and restored. The majority were used on floors, but this was not always the case.

Manufacturers
The firm of William Godwin began production of encaustic tiles at Lugwardine near Hereford in 1852. Despite its mark, this tile was probably made at nearby Withington, where a second factory was established by the firm in 1863. Many of the tiles produced by the firm were based on medieval prototypes. Due to their authentic appearance, Godwin tiles were reputed to be favoured above those of other manufacturers by the architects George Gilbert Scott (1811-1878) and G.E Street (1824-1881) in their church restorations.

Places
This tile was part of a group removed from the Chapter House of Salisbury Cathedral in the late 1960s or early 1970s. They almost certainly date from Gilbert Scott's restoration of the cathedral, begun in 1863. The design is taken from medieval tiles used at Salisbury and elsewhere.
Collection
Accession Number
C.206-1986

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record createdSeptember 28, 1998
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