Coat

1850-1900 (made)
Coat thumbnail 1
Coat thumbnail 2
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Time was of little consequence in the making of this coat. Every inch of the garment has been covered with floral stripes embroidered in cross-stitch. A green and white tablet-woven band has been sewn on as an edging and the large red silk stitches holding it in place can be seen around the edge of the silk lining. Not only was the vast expanse of embroidery time-consuming to produce. The resist-dyed (ikat) lining would have required three separate dyeing processes to create the four-coloured effect. In addition, some of the panels were glazed after dyeing to make them darker and more reflective.

Resist-dyeing involves blocking out areas of the fabric with a resist agent, often a wax or paste, to prevent them from taking dye. The resist agent is then removed. By repeating this process a multi-coloured pattern can be created.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Cotton, embroidered with silk and lined with silk ikat
Brief Description
Man's embroidered robe, Uzbekistan (probably Shakhrisabz), 1850-1900.
Physical Description
Coat, cotton embroidered with silk and lined with silk ikat.
Dimensions
  • Length: 144cm
  • At hem, approx. width: 98cm
Gallery Label
Jameel Gallery Man's Embroidered Robe Uzbekistan, probably Shahrisabz, 1850-1900 Cotton in plain weave, with silk embroidery; tablet-woven silk edging; silk warp ikat lining Museum no. T.61-1925(2006-2012)
Subject depicted
Summary
Time was of little consequence in the making of this coat. Every inch of the garment has been covered with floral stripes embroidered in cross-stitch. A green and white tablet-woven band has been sewn on as an edging and the large red silk stitches holding it in place can be seen around the edge of the silk lining. Not only was the vast expanse of embroidery time-consuming to produce. The resist-dyed (ikat) lining would have required three separate dyeing processes to create the four-coloured effect. In addition, some of the panels were glazed after dyeing to make them darker and more reflective.



Resist-dyeing involves blocking out areas of the fabric with a resist agent, often a wax or paste, to prevent them from taking dye. The resist agent is then removed. By repeating this process a multi-coloured pattern can be created.
Bibliographic Reference
Crill, Rosemary, Jennifer Wearden and Verity Wilson. Dress in Detail from Around the World. London: V&A Publications, 2002. 224 p., ill. ISBN 09781851773787. p. 138
Collection
Accession Number
T.61-1925

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record createdFebruary 5, 2004
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