Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Sacred Silver & Stained Glass, Room 83, The Whiteley Galleries

Geldulph de Nausnydere with Saint Geldulph

Panel
1526 (made), after 1526 (repaired)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Stained-glass windows could be very expensive to produce. A church wishing to glaze its windows with elaborately painted glass would have to seek sponsorship. In large cathedrals, wealthy ecclesiastics or members of royal families would often supply the necessary funds. Smaller institutions would have to seek financial assistance from well-off members of their communities. The people who contributed these funds are known as 'donors'. If they are depicted in the window they financed, as in this example, the windows are known as 'donor windows'.

Donors may or may not have had a say in the subject matter of the windows they contributed to. Often, the subjects, or themes, would have been determined by the needs of the church, but donors could request that they be depicted somewhere in the scheme, accompanied by their patron saint, as we see in this panel.

The donor in this panel is Geldulph de Nausnydere, who was alderman of Louvain (Leuven) in 1517 and 1524. It was placed at the base of a window, possibly in the south chapel of the Charterhouse of Louvain, which was a monastery of the Carthusian Order. The Charterhouse was founded at the end of the 15th century [DG13]by the dukes of Burgundy. It was financed with donations from ducal family members, as well as from clerics of the surrounding areas and local residents.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Clear and coloured glass with painted details and yellow (silver) stain
Brief Description
Panel of clear, coloured and flashed glass with painted details and yellow (silver) stain. Depicting Geldolph de Nausnydere and his patron Saint Geldulph. Made in the Netherlands, 1526
Physical Description
Panel, stained glass, Geldulph de Nausnydere in prayer with his patron St. Geldulph standing behind him, whose shield displays the arms of Burgundy Ancient quartered with cleves. Outside the window a stag hunt is in progress. Behind the saint there is the legend:- SCTE GELDULPHE ORA PRO, while the inscription at the foot of the panel relates to the burial of the Virgin in the Valley of Jehoshaphat. Geldulph de Nausnydere, whose name is contained within the scrolls in the spandrels, was echevin of Lourain in 1517 and 1525.
Dimensions
  • Height: 69.5cm
  • Width: 46.5cm
Marks and Inscriptions
  • 'S[AN]CTE GELDVLPH[VS] ORA PRO' (Decoration; Latin; inscription running behind the saint; stained glass)
  • Defuncta Maria venerabilit, ac reveret, ab apostolis adsepulchru deducta e Monstrat' sepulchru ei in vallis Josaphat medio, ubi in ei honorem fabrica e ecclesia in qua sepulta fuisse ab omnibus idide predicatur This inscription is not original to the panel. (This inscription is not original to the panel.)
Gallery Label
GELDULPH DE NAUSNYDERE WITH SAINT GELDULPH Geldulph de Nausnydere was alderman of Louvain (Leuven) in 1517 and 1524. He is shown here with his name-saint behind him, as was common in Late Medieval and Renaissance donor panels. The pendant to this panel, showing his wife Martha de Nausnydere, is now in St Mary's Church in Shrewsbury, and is dated 1526. The panels probably originally flanked a panel with the Virgin and Child with St Anne, Joseph and Joachim now in Earsham Church on the Norfolk/Suffolk border. It is likely that the panels were originally placed in one of the south chapel windows of the church of the Charterhouse of Louvain. The long inscription at the bottom of the panel is an intrusion from a different scene. Netherlands (Louvain), 1526 Museum no. 211-1908((PW) 2003)
Object history
Had been bought by Sir Peter Neave in the marketplace in Rouen in about 1820 and were thought at that time to have come from an old church in Rouen.

The pendant to this panel, showing his wife Martha de Nausnydere, is now in St Mary’s Church in Shrewsbury, and is dated 1526. The panels probably originally flanked a panel with the Virgin and Child with St Anne, Joseph and Joachim now in Earsham Church on the Norfolk/Suffolk border. It is likely that the panels were originally placed in one of the south chapel windows of the church of the Charterhouse of Louvain. The long inscription at the bottom of the panel is an intrusion from a different scene.
Historical context
Stained glass windows could be very expensive to produce. A church wishing to glaze its windows with elaborately painted glass would have to seek sponsorship. In large cathedrals, wealthy ecclesiastics or members of royal families would often supply the necessary funds. Smaller institutions would have to seek financial assistance from well-off members of their communities. The people who contributed these funds are known as 'donors' and if they are depicted in the window they financed, as in this example, those windows are known as 'donor windows'.



Donors may or may not have had a say in the subject matter of the windows they contributed to. Often, the subjects, or themes, would have been determined by the needs of the church but the donor could request that he or she be depicted somewhere in the scheme and be accompanied by their patron saint, as we see in this panel.



The donor in this panel is Geldulph de Nausnydere who was alderman of Louvain (Leuven) in 1517 and 1524. This panel was placed at the base of a window, possibly in a the south chapel of the Charterhouse of Louvain. The Charterhouse in Louvain was a monastery of the Carthusian Order founded at the end of the 15th century by the Dukes of Burgundy. It was financed with donations from the ducal family members as well as from clerics of the surrounding areas and local residents.
Subjects depicted
Summary
Stained-glass windows could be very expensive to produce. A church wishing to glaze its windows with elaborately painted glass would have to seek sponsorship. In large cathedrals, wealthy ecclesiastics or members of royal families would often supply the necessary funds. Smaller institutions would have to seek financial assistance from well-off members of their communities. The people who contributed these funds are known as 'donors'. If they are depicted in the window they financed, as in this example, the windows are known as 'donor windows'.



Donors may or may not have had a say in the subject matter of the windows they contributed to. Often, the subjects, or themes, would have been determined by the needs of the church, but donors could request that they be depicted somewhere in the scheme, accompanied by their patron saint, as we see in this panel.



The donor in this panel is Geldulph de Nausnydere, who was alderman of Louvain (Leuven) in 1517 and 1524. It was placed at the base of a window, possibly in the south chapel of the Charterhouse of Louvain, which was a monastery of the Carthusian Order. The Charterhouse was founded at the end of the 15th century [DG13]by the dukes of Burgundy. It was financed with donations from ducal family members, as well as from clerics of the surrounding areas and local residents.
Associated Object
Bibliographic References
  • Williamson, Paul. Medieval and Renaissance Stained Glass in the Victoria and Albert Museum. London, 2003. ISBN 1851774041
  • P.V. Maes, 'Oud Leuvins brandglas in England', Leuvons, 1972
  • Hilary Wayment, Oud Holland, vol.103 (1989)
  • Jessie McNab, A Guide To Flemish Renaissance Stained Glass From The Great Cloister Of The Carthusian Monastery In Louvain Belgium With Illustrations, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Belgium, 1982
Collection
Accession Number
211-1908

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record createdAugust 17, 1998
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