Textile Panel thumbnail 1
Textile Panel thumbnail 2
Not currently on display at the V&A

Textile Panel

1650-1800 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This cover is an example of embroidery from Azerbaijan. It dates from the late 17th century. At that time Azerbaijan was larger than the modern republic. It reached further to the south and the west, with Tabriz as its main town.

Technically embroideries from Azerbaijan fall into three groups. This piece, worked in cross stitch, is an example of the earliest. Until recently textile historians thought that these embroidered designs were copied from hand-knotted carpets. However, we now think that the carpet-weaving industry took its inspiration from these embroideries and not the other way round.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Cotton, embroidered with silk
Brief Description
Middle East, Textile; Panel, silk-embroidered cotton, design of star-medallions and border cartouches on black ground, Azerbaijan or NW Iran, 1700-1800
Physical Description
Possibly the front panel for a large cushion; cotton embroidered with coloured silks in cross stitch.

The centre is occupied with three star-shaped compartments filled with conventional serrated floral designs; round these are long irregularly shaped compartments with similar designs. The whole is surrounded by a narrow border. The ground is black, filled with serrated hook-shaped devices in colours; in three of the corners are conventional trees.
Dimensions
  • Height: 710mm
  • Width: 1310mm
Style
Object history
Purchased for £15 from Mrs Farngotchian, The Maples, Northwood, Middlesex.
Subjects depicted
Summary
This cover is an example of embroidery from Azerbaijan. It dates from the late 17th century. At that time Azerbaijan was larger than the modern republic. It reached further to the south and the west, with Tabriz as its main town.



Technically embroideries from Azerbaijan fall into three groups. This piece, worked in cross stitch, is an example of the earliest. Until recently textile historians thought that these embroidered designs were copied from hand-knotted carpets. However, we now think that the carpet-weaving industry took its inspiration from these embroideries and not the other way round.
Bibliographic References
  • Persian Art. An Illustrated Souvenir of the Exhibition of Persian Art at Burlington House London 1931 (London: 1931) p.85: Cat.no.828A.
  • Victoria and Albert Museum Department of Textiles, Brief Guide to the Persian Embroideries (London: Board of Education, 1929) Pl.IV.
Collection
Accession Number
401-1906

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record createdJanuary 5, 2004
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