Flowerpot thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

Flowerpot

Embroidered Picture
ca. 1876 (designed), 1890-1900 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This is an example of a small, square design for cushion covers and fire screens. People could buy them as finished embroideries or as kits to complete at home. They were an inexpensive way of acquiring William Morris's work, and many examples have survived.

May Morris embroidered this piece. She was William Morris's youngest daughter and manager of the embroidery section of Morris & Co. from 1885 until 1896. She was a highly accomplished designer and a leading Arts and Crafts embroiderer and jewellery maker. She embroidered both her own designs and those of family and friends. The 'Flowerpot' pattern you see here is probably William Morris's last design for embroidery. His inspiration was two lacis panels acquired by the V&A in 1875.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Wool, embroidered with silks
Physical Description
Coloured silks on wool

worked in chain stitch, satin stitch, stem stitch and speckling. Shades of red, blue and green, yellow and white.
Dimensions
  • Length: 54.6cm
  • Width: 54cm
Credit line
Bequeathed by the maker
Subjects depicted
Summary
This is an example of a small, square design for cushion covers and fire screens. People could buy them as finished embroideries or as kits to complete at home. They were an inexpensive way of acquiring William Morris's work, and many examples have survived.



May Morris embroidered this piece. She was William Morris's youngest daughter and manager of the embroidery section of Morris & Co. from 1885 until 1896. She was a highly accomplished designer and a leading Arts and Crafts embroiderer and jewellery maker. She embroidered both her own designs and those of family and friends. The 'Flowerpot' pattern you see here is probably William Morris's last design for embroidery. His inspiration was two lacis panels acquired by the V&A in 1875.
Collection
Accession Number
T.68-1939

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record createdJanuary 5, 2004
Record URL