Not currently on display at the V&A

Sampler

1948-1950 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Sampler of Jacobean stitches, linen embroidered with wool; mounted on a board. There are four sections:
Upper Right: light, open motifs including a bird and a butterfly.
Lower Right: heavy, dense foliate pattern.
Lower Left: unconnected elements of leaves and flowers.
Upper Left: four unconnected motifs - a fruit, a flower, a leaf and a creeper entwining a branch.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Linen embroidered with wool
Brief Description
Sample of ecclesiastical needlework and/or embroidery by Barbara Dawson, British, Royal School of Needlework, 1948-50
Physical Description
Sampler of Jacobean stitches, linen embroidered with wool; mounted on a board. There are four sections:

Upper Right: light, open motifs including a bird and a butterfly.

Lower Right: heavy, dense foliate pattern.

Lower Left: unconnected elements of leaves and flowers.

Upper Left: four unconnected motifs - a fruit, a flower, a leaf and a creeper entwining a branch.
Dimensions
  • Length: 50cm
  • Width: 49.5cm
Credit line
Given by Miss Barbara Dawson
Object history
Notes from Miss Dawson:

Experimental work with Jacobean or crewel embroidery was limited.

Bringing the needle up into the end of the previous row makes a softer insertion than when the needle is taken down. A double stitch at the tip of a leaf or petal holds a good shape with stitches on either side in support. A line of split stitch makes a useful padding.

Two main ways to use shading:

Long and short stitches: only the first row is worked in long and short stitches, the next row is worked with stitches of equal length.

Block shading: the first row of stitches are of equal length. The second row are also of equal length but overlap the first row, the needle being taken down between the stitches; succeeding rows follow in the same way.
Production
Worked by Barbara Dawson as a student at the Royal School of Needlework.
Collection
Accession Number
T.46-2003

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record createdDecember 18, 2003
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