Not currently on display at the V&A

Hat

1750-1770 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Wide-brimmed hats with shallow crowns were popular for women in the mid 18th century. They were often made in a range of materials such as straw, openwork, paper and ribbon. This example shows the use of feathers of common origin, such as those from cocks or guinea fowl, dyed in a variety of colours for a vivid effect. Such hats were worn as fashionable daywear with short jackets and petticoats. They demonstrate the 18th-century trend for taking items traditionally associated with working-class dress and transforming them into fashionable styles.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Feathers, linen and silk, hand-stitched with silk and linen thread
Physical Description
A round hat with a shallow crown and wide brim decorated with cock and guineafowl feathers in natural colours and dyed blue, yellow, red and green. The feathers are stitched to a linen ground which is lined with blue taffeta.
Dimensions
  • Overall diameter: 38.0cm
  • Crown diameter: 13.2cm
  • Overall height: 8.0cm
Credit line
Purchased with Art Fund support and assistance from the Friends of the V&A, and a number of private donors
Object history
Formerly part of the Castle Howard Costume collection, the private collection of George Howard. Purchased on 7 October 2003 from the Sotheby's.



Historical significance: In the 18th century, wide-brimmed, shallow crowned hats were popular for women in a range of materials such as straw, openwork, paper, ribbons. This example demonstrates the use of feathers, of common origin, but dyed in a variety of colours.
Summary
Wide-brimmed hats with shallow crowns were popular for women in the mid 18th century. They were often made in a range of materials such as straw, openwork, paper and ribbon. This example shows the use of feathers of common origin, such as those from cocks or guinea fowl, dyed in a variety of colours for a vivid effect. Such hats were worn as fashionable daywear with short jackets and petticoats. They demonstrate the 18th-century trend for taking items traditionally associated with working-class dress and transforming them into fashionable styles.
Collection
Accession Number
T.90-2003

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record createdNovember 18, 2003
Record URL