Panel thumbnail 1
Panel thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 125, Edwin and Susan Davies Gallery

Panel

1864 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This stained glass panel is originally from a series of seven depicting scenes from the 'Legend of Good Women'. They were designed by Edward Burne-Jones and made by the firm of Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co.
The 'Legend of Good Women' was written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 1380s. It is an epic poem written in iambic pentameter describing how the personification of 'Amor' came to him in his sleep and related the stories of ten women from antiquity, all of whom suffered for love. The imagery on this panel shows Chaucer asleep in his bower, prior to the visitation and revelations of Amor.
Burne-Jones first used this theme in a series of tiles he designed for the firm in 1862, and again for an embroidery in 1863; the latter was never executed.
In 1864, Burne-Jones designed a set of 7 stained glass windows with this theme for Myles Birket Foster's house, The Hill, in Witley, Surrey.
This panel is from another series of the same theme which were made specifically for the Exhibition of Stained Glass, Mosaic, etc. held at the South Kensington Museum (later the Victoria & Albert Museum) in 1864.
A design for this panel is held in Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Clear and coloured glass, painted with brown pigment and yellow (silver) stain
Brief Description
Clear and coloured glass with painted and stained details, depicting the poet Geoffrey Chaucer asleep. Designed by Edward Burne-Jones and made by Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co.. England, 1864
Physical Description
Geoffrey Chaucer wears a dark green gown with yellow cuffs and he wears a brown turban on his head. He lies on his right side, propped up on his elbow in a field of flowers in front of a picket fence, painted in brown pigment and silver stain. Behind the fence is a brick building fronted by elaborate columns topped with corinthian capitals, a door in the centre opens out into an exterior space with a chequered floor, all executed in brown pigment and silver stain.
Dimensions
  • Height: 46.8cm
  • Width: 48.2cm
  • Depth: 3.2cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 22/08/2000 by Drew
Gallery Label
British Galleries: This is the first of a series of stained-glass panels based on the English poet Geoffrey Chaucer's 'Legend of Good Women', composed around 1385-1386. It was a favourite source for Morris and his circle. The panel forms part of a group of four bought by the Museum from an exhibition of contemporary glass held here in 1864. They were the Museum's first Morris acquisitions.(27/03/2003)
Object history
Designed by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones (born in Birmingham, 1833, died in London, 1898); made by Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co., London.

The 'Legend of Good Women' was written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 1380s. It is an epic poem written in iambic pentameter describing how the personification of 'Amor' came to him in his sleep and related the stories of ten women from antiquity, all of whom suffered for love. The imagery on this panel shows Chaucer asleep in his bower, prior to the visitation and revelations of Amor.

Burne-Jones first used this theme in a series of tiles he designed for the firm in 1862, and again for an embroidery in 1863; the latter was never executed.

In 1864, Burne-Jones designed a set of 7 stained glass windows with this theme for Myles Birket Foster's house, The Hill, in Witley, Surrey.

This panel is from another series of the same theme which were made specifically for the Exhibition of Stained Glass, Mosaic, etc. held at the South Kensington Museum (later the Victoria & Albert Museum) in 1864.

A design for this panel is held in Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery.
Literary ReferenceLegend of Good Women
Summary
This stained glass panel is originally from a series of seven depicting scenes from the 'Legend of Good Women'. They were designed by Edward Burne-Jones and made by the firm of Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co.

The 'Legend of Good Women' was written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 1380s. It is an epic poem written in iambic pentameter describing how the personification of 'Amor' came to him in his sleep and related the stories of ten women from antiquity, all of whom suffered for love. The imagery on this panel shows Chaucer asleep in his bower, prior to the visitation and revelations of Amor.

Burne-Jones first used this theme in a series of tiles he designed for the firm in 1862, and again for an embroidery in 1863; the latter was never executed.

In 1864, Burne-Jones designed a set of 7 stained glass windows with this theme for Myles Birket Foster's house, The Hill, in Witley, Surrey.

This panel is from another series of the same theme which were made specifically for the Exhibition of Stained Glass, Mosaic, etc. held at the South Kensington Museum (later the Victoria & Albert Museum) in 1864.

A design for this panel is held in Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery.
Bibliographic References
  • Barringer, T. Rosenfeld, J. and Smith A. Pre-Raphaelites: Victorian Avant-Garde. London: Tate Publishing, 2012.p.157
  • Edward Burne-Jones: Victorian Artist Dreamer, exhibition catalogue, 1998
  • Country Life, 4 April 1975, pp.1548-50
  • Glass, or Glass-making as a creative art through the ages, Leeds : Temple Newsam House, 1961200
Collection
Accession Number
774-1864

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record createdJuly 21, 1998
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