Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Sacred Silver & Stained Glass, Room 83, The Whiteley Galleries

Panel

first half 19th century (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

In the early 19th century, Francis Henry Egerton, 8th Earl of Bridgwater (1756–1829) purchased more than 120 panels of 16th-century stained glass from the former abbeys at Steinfeld and Mariawald in Germany.

The surviving panels reveal that in their original settings the windows had depicted Old and New Testament scenes. These were arranged typologically (when persons or events in the Old Testament are paired symbolically with ones in the New Testament), one above the other. Donor panels were placed below, and panels depicting prophets above.

The Christian church has always believed that God spoke through his prophets. They were seen as the deliverers of God’s messages concerning the future, including the Coming of the Messiah. In the medieval period Amos was included among them. Prophet panels are also known as ‘messenger panels’, because they convey divinely inspired prophecies or messages.

When Francis Egerton began to install this glass in the windows of his chapel at Ashridge Park in Hertfordshire, he realised that the scheme was incomplete and that some of the original prophet panels were missing. He commissioned the stained-glass artist Joseph Hale Miller to make replacements.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Stained glass
Brief Description
Panel of clear and coloured glass with painted details and yellow (silver) stain. Depicting the Prophet Amos. English, by Joseph Hale Miller, c.1811-31.
Physical Description
Panel: tracery light. Half figure of the Prophet Amos, surrounded by a meandering vine with fruit and foliage.
Dimensions
  • Height: 16.5in
  • Width: 27.75in
Gallery Label
TRACERY LIGHT WITH A HALF FIGURE OF THE PROPHET AMOS Like Thomas Willement, Joseph Hale Miller was one of the pioneers of the revival of medieval techniques of stained glass design and construction in the early 19th century. Miller was commissioned to restore the 16th-century German glass bought for the Chapel of Ashridge Park in Hertfordshire sometime between 1811 and 1831. It is believed that he made several of these prophet panels to supplement ones missing from the original scheme. This panel is one of several (see David nearby) made in the Gothic style. Amos, an Old Testament prophet, was thought to have prophesised the rebirth of the House of David which occurred with the birth of Jesus Christ. England (London), 1811-31, possibly by Joseph Hale Miller From the chapel of Ashridge Park, Hertfordshire, built in 1808 Museum no. C.232-1928; given by E.E. Cook Esq.((TB) 2004)
Credit line
Given by E.E. Cook. Esquire.
Historical context
In the early 19th century, Francis Henry Egerton, 8th Earl of Bridgwater (1756-1829) purchased over 120 panels of 16th century stained glass from the former abbeys at Steinfeld and Mariawald in Germany.



From the surviving panels it can be seen that the windows in their original settings had depicted Old and New Testament scenes arranged typologically one above the other with donor panels placed below and panels depicting prophets placed above.



These prophet panels are also known as 'messenger panels' because they convey divinely inspired prophecies or messages.



From the earliest centuries of the Christian Church it was believed that God had spoken through his prophets. So they were thought of as the deliverers of His messages concerning the future including the Coming of the Messiah. In the medieval period Amos was included amongst the prophets.



When Francis Egerton began to install this glass in the windows of his chapel at Ashridge Park in Hertfordshire, he realised that the scheme was incomplete and that some of the original prophet panels were missing.



He commissioned the stained glass artist, Joseph Hale Miller, to make replacements for these missing panels.
Summary
In the early 19th century, Francis Henry Egerton, 8th Earl of Bridgwater (1756–1829) purchased more than 120 panels of 16th-century stained glass from the former abbeys at Steinfeld and Mariawald in Germany.



The surviving panels reveal that in their original settings the windows had depicted Old and New Testament scenes. These were arranged typologically (when persons or events in the Old Testament are paired symbolically with ones in the New Testament), one above the other. Donor panels were placed below, and panels depicting prophets above.



The Christian church has always believed that God spoke through his prophets. They were seen as the deliverers of God’s messages concerning the future, including the Coming of the Messiah. In the medieval period Amos was included among them. Prophet panels are also known as ‘messenger panels’, because they convey divinely inspired prophecies or messages.



When Francis Egerton began to install this glass in the windows of his chapel at Ashridge Park in Hertfordshire, he realised that the scheme was incomplete and that some of the original prophet panels were missing. He commissioned the stained-glass artist Joseph Hale Miller to make replacements.
Collection
Accession Number
C.232-1928

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record createdJuly 14, 1998
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