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Dessert spoon

Dessert spoon

  • Place of origin:

    London (made)

  • Date:

    1830-1831 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Hayne, Jonathan (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Silver, die stamped

  • Credit Line:

    Bequeathed by Miss D.B. Simpson

  • Museum number:

    M.182:6-1977

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

Spoons, of different shapes and sizes for specific activities like eating dessert or soup or for taking snuff, developed in the 17th century. The dessert spoon was not commonly used until the early 18th century, when matching sets of cutlery became standard, with table spoons used for soup and smaller spoons for eating the fresh and candied fruits of the dessert course. Dessert cutlery, which could consist of knives and forks as well as spoons, was never laid on the table as part of the cover when dining a la Russe. It would be brought to the diner with a dessert plate for the last course of the meal. Old English and Fiddle were two of the most popular designs for cutlery and flatware and were produced in enormous quantities in the Victorian period.

Physical description

Spoon, silver, fiddle,thread and shell pattern

Place of Origin

London (made)

Date

1830-1831 (made)

Artist/maker

Hayne, Jonathan (maker)

Materials and Techniques

Silver, die stamped

Marks and inscriptions

Marked on the back of the handle with London hall mark, duty, sterling, date letter for 1830-31, maker's mark of Jonathan Hayne. Crest of a boar's head on the front of the handle.

Dimensions

Length: 83 mm, Width: 40 mm, Height: 28 mm

Object history note

Bequeathed by Miss D. B. Simpson

Historical context note

Spoons, of different shapes and sizes for specific activities like eating dessert or soup or for taking snuff, developed in the 17th century. The dessert spoon was not commonly used until the early 18th century, when matching sets of cutlery became standard, with table spoons used for soup and smaller spoons for eating the fresh and candied fruits of dessert. Dessert cutlery, which could consist of knives and forks as well as spoons was never laid on the table as part of the cover when dining a la Russe. It would be brought to the diner with a dessert plate for that stage of the meal. Old English and Fiddle were two of the most popular designs for cutlery and flatware and were produced in enormous quantities in the Victorian period.

Descriptive line

Dessert spoon, silver, London hallmarks for 1830-31, made by Jonathan Hayne.

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Arthur Grimwade, London Goldsmiths 1697-1837, London, 1990, p. 106 & 541

Labels and date

Dessert spoon, silver, one of a set of four dessert spoons and six dessert forks with Fiddle, thread and shell pattern,
Mark of Jonathan Hayne, London, 1830-31
Miss D.B. Simpson Bequest
M.182:6-1977 []

Materials

Silver

Techniques

Die stamping

Subjects depicted

Shell

Categories

Metalwork; Tableware & cutlery

Production Type

Mass produced

Collection

Metalwork Collection

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