Or are you looking for Search the Archives?

Please complete the form to email this item.

Print - Asoka's Queen
  • Asoka's Queen
    Tagore, Abanindranath, born 1871 - died 1951
  • Enlarge image

Asoka's Queen

  • Object:

    Print

  • Place of origin:

    Bengal (made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1910 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Tagore, Abanindranath, born 1871 - died 1951 (artist)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Chromoxylograph, reproduction of a watercolour

  • Credit Line:

    Given by Lady Sonia Wilson

  • Museum number:

    IS.308-1951

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

The scene depicts the graceful figure of Asoka's Queen standing in front of the railings of the Buddhist monument at Sanchi built during the reign of her husband King Asoka. The print is based on an original painting held in the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle.

Abanindranath Tagore (1871-1951) was the pioneer and leading exponent of the Bengal School of Art. In his paintings, he sought to counter the influence of Western art as taught in art schools under the British Raj, by modernizing indigenous Moghul and Rajput traditions. His work became so influential that it was eventually accepted and regarded as a national Indian style.

Physical description

Reproduction of a watercolour, this image depicts the graceful figure of Asoka's Queen standing in front of the railings of the Buddhist monument at Sanchi, built during the reign of her husband King Asoka. The chromoxylograph was probably printed in Japan from wood-blocks.

Place of Origin

Bengal (made)

Date

ca. 1910 (made)

Artist/maker

Tagore, Abanindranath, born 1871 - died 1951 (artist)

Materials and Techniques

Chromoxylograph, reproduction of a watercolour

Marks and inscriptions

Bengali signature on left hand corner.
On reverse see Indian Society of Oriental Art, Calcutta stamp.

Dimensions

Height: 25.2 cm, Width: 19 cm, Height: 40.5 cm Paper upon which card is mounted, Width: 32.4 cm Paper upon which card is mounted

Object history note

Gift. RF 51/3488. From the collection of Sir E. B. Havell. Given by Lady Sonia Wilson, daughter of E.B.Havell
The print is based on an original painting held in the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle.

Historical context note

Abanindranath Tagore (1871-1951) was the pioneer and leading exponent of the Bengal School of Art. In his paintings, he sought to counter the influence of Western art as taught in art schools under the British Raj, by modernizing indigenous Moghul and Rajput traditions. His work became so influential that it was eventually accepted and regarded as a national Indian style.

In his work, Abanindranath retrieved themes from the Indian epic past or scenes from romantic tales, such as Arabian Nights or Omar Khaiyam and reworked them in a highly romanticised style. The artist’s desire to emancipate Indian art from European influence was also fostered by Japanese artist Okakura Kakuzo, who visited him in 1902. Later, studying Japanese art under Japanese artists, Taikoan and Hilsida, Abanindranath assimilated Far Eastern techniques such as the wash into his work. His Omar Khaiyam series (1906-08) reflects such influences. Abanindranath’s use of colour was also highly personalized and found its appropriate language in two major techniques: wash and tempera.

Descriptive line

Painting reproduction, 'Asoka's Queen' by Abanindranath Tagore, chromoxylograph, Bengal, ca. 1910

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Dr Ratan Parimoo, The paintings of the three great Tagores: Abanindranath Tagore, Gaganendranath Tagore and Rabindranath Tagore. Chronology and comparative studies, 1973

Techniques

Printed

Subjects depicted

Queen

Categories

Prints; Royalty; Buddhism; Bonita Trust Indian Paintings Cataloguing Project

Collection

South & South East Asia Collection

Large image request

Please confirm you are using these images within the following terms and conditions, by acknowledging each of the following key points:

Please let us know how you intend to use the images you will be downloading.