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Painting - View of the wood bazaar, Simla
  • View of the wood bazaar, Simla
    Carpenter, William, born 1818 - died 1899
  • Enlarge image

View of the wood bazaar, Simla

  • Object:

    Painting

  • Place of origin:

    Simla (made)

  • Date:

    08/1853-11/1853 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Carpenter, William, born 1818 - died 1899 (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Pencil and watercolour on paper

  • Museum number:

    IS.63-1882

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

William Carpenter was trained at the Royal Academy Schools. He was in India from 1850 t0 1856, during which time he travelled extensively from Bombay (Mumbai) and across western India to Rajasthan, Delhi, Kashmir, Lahore and Afghanistan. His depiction of every day street scenes and groups of people is remarkably accurate and animated, his portraits vividly capturing the character of his sitters and the glowing effects of sunlight as cityscapes and architectural monuments. Brilliantly executed in a range of warm colours, his watercolours evoke a gentle romanticism.

After his return to England, The Illustrated London News published some of his watercolours. In 1881, he exhibited 275 of his paintings in a one-man show in the South Kensington Museum, London. This entire collection was subsequently acquired by the V&A.

This painting shows the wood bazaar at Simla, the most famous of India's hill stations. Simla was 'discovered' by a party of British surveyors in 1817, and its comparatively cool climate led to its becoming, in 1864, the official summer headquarters of the Indian Government. Here the British administrators could continue their work away from the heat of the plains.

Physical description

A street winding up a hillside with huts, adults and children, trees, and mountains in the background.

Place of Origin

Simla (made)

Date

08/1853-11/1853 (made)

Artist/maker

Carpenter, William, born 1818 - died 1899 (maker)

Materials and Techniques

Pencil and watercolour on paper

Marks and inscriptions

The wood Bazaar Simla: W. Carpenter 1853.

Dimensions

Height: 24 cm sight, Width: 34 cm sight

Object history note

Historical significance: William Carpenter (1818-99)

William Carpenter was trained at the Royal Academy Schools, and was the eldest son of the distinguished portrait painter Margaret Sarah Carpenter and William Hookham Carpenter, who became Keeper of the Prints and Drawings Department at the British Museum.

He was in India from 1850 t0 1856, during which time he travelled extensively from Bombay (Mumbai) and across western India to Rajasthan, Delhi, Kashmir, Lahore and Afghanistan. His depiction of every day street scenes and groups of people is remarkably accurate and animated, his portraits vividly capturing the character of his sitters and the glowing effects of sunlight as cityscapes and architectural monuments. Brilliantly executed in a range of warm colours, his watercolours evoke a gentle romanticism.

After his return to England, The Illustrated London News published some of his watercolours. In 1881, he exhibited 275 of his paintings in a one-man show in the South Kensington Museum, London. This entire collection was subsequently acquired by the V&A.

Descriptive line

View of the wood bazaar in Simla by William Carpenter, painting, watercolour on paper, India, 1853.

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

p. 274, pl. 28
Rohatgi P. and Parlett G., assisted by Imray S. and Godrej P. Indian Life and Landscape by Western Artists: Paintings and Drawings from the Victoria and Albert Museum, 17th to the early 20th century. Published by Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya, Mumbai, in association with V&A, London, 2008. ISBN 81-901020-9-5.
p. 63
Patel, Divia; Rohatgi, Pauline and Godrej, Pheroza, "Indian Life and Landscape by Western Artists: an exhibition of paintings and drawings from the 17th to the early 20th century organised by the V&A and CSMVS". Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS), Mumbai and Victoria and Albert Museum, 2008, ISBN:81-901020-8-7

Labels and date

This painting shows the wood bazaar at Simla, the most famous of India's hill stations. Simla was 'discovered' by a party of British surveyors in 1817, and its comparatively cool climate led to its becoming, in 1864, the official summer headquarters of the Indian Government. Here the British administrators could continue their work away from the heat of the plains. [1/12/2008]

Materials

Paper; Pencil; Watercolour

Techniques

Painting

Categories

Paintings

Collection

South & South East Asia Collection

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