Not currently on display at the V&A

View of the Jami Masjid, Delhi

Painting
possibly 08/1852 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This painting by William Carpenter (1818-1899) shows a view of the Jami Masjid in Delhi as seen from the upstairs balcony of a grand house, which overlooks the street leading to the north entrance. Members of the Muslim household are seen taking refreshments on the carved wooden balcony. The Jami Masjid is India's largest mosque and was built between 1644 and 1656 during the reign of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan.

In early 1850 Carpenter set off in the footsteps of his younger brother Percy, also an artist, and landed in Bombay. He spent much of his time painting portraits of local rulers and the surrounding countryside, often sporting Indian dress himself. He travelled widely, from Sri Lanka to Kashmir, and he also spent some time in the Panjab and Afghanistan before moving south to Rajasthan. He appears to have returned to England in 1856. Ten years later he was living in Boston, but he later returned to London, where he died.

Carpenter was the eldest son of the distinguished portrait painter Margaret Sarah Carpenter (née Geddes) and William Hookham Carpenter, who was Keeper of the Prints and Drawings Department at the British Museum.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Watercolour on paper
Physical Description
Distant view of the Jami Masjid from an upstairs balcony of a house, with other houses and crowds of people below.
Dimensions
  • Height: 24cm
  • Width: 34.5cm
Marks and Inscriptions
THE JUMMA MUSJID AT DEHLI [changed to DELHI] (formerly on mount)
Summary
This painting by William Carpenter (1818-1899) shows a view of the Jami Masjid in Delhi as seen from the upstairs balcony of a grand house, which overlooks the street leading to the north entrance. Members of the Muslim household are seen taking refreshments on the carved wooden balcony. The Jami Masjid is India's largest mosque and was built between 1644 and 1656 during the reign of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan.



In early 1850 Carpenter set off in the footsteps of his younger brother Percy, also an artist, and landed in Bombay. He spent much of his time painting portraits of local rulers and the surrounding countryside, often sporting Indian dress himself. He travelled widely, from Sri Lanka to Kashmir, and he also spent some time in the Panjab and Afghanistan before moving south to Rajasthan. He appears to have returned to England in 1856. Ten years later he was living in Boston, but he later returned to London, where he died.



Carpenter was the eldest son of the distinguished portrait painter Margaret Sarah Carpenter (née Geddes) and William Hookham Carpenter, who was Keeper of the Prints and Drawings Department at the British Museum.
Bibliographic Reference
Rohatgi P. and Parlett G., assisted by Imray S. and Godrej P. Indian Life and Landscape by Western Artists: Paintings and Drawings from the Victoria and Albert Museum, 17th to the early 20th century. Published by Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya, Mumbai, in association with V&A, London, 2008. ISBN 81-901020-9-5.p. 274, pl. 27
Collection
Accession Number
IS.189-1881

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record createdJuly 14, 2003
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