Not currently on display at the V&A

Colonial produce

Print
1854 (published)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
Designed by Joseph Nash, this is one of the set of views published with accompanying text as Dickinson's Comprehensive Pictures of the Great Exhibition, exploiting the newly available technique of colour lithography. Nash was one of the more prolific artists working with this medium, whereby a picture is made by printing from a flat surface (traditionally stone, now often a metal plate), on which the artist draws or paints the original design with a greasy substance. The surface is next prepared, moistened and inked; the greasy printing ink adheres to the design, which is then printed onto a sheet of paper.

Historical Association
This view of the colonial exhibits shows that, as well as works of art and manufacture, a large number of natural resources were on display, including minerals, fruit and vegetables. The aim was to impress the visitor by the quality of colonial produce. The comparatively few artefacts on display emphasised the importance of these countries to Britain as sources of raw materials and as new markets for their manufactured goods. The official catalogue described Australia, for example, as 'the most extensive wool-producing country in the world', with valuable exports to Britain.

The British and colonial exhibits were grouped together in the western branch of the prestigious main avenue, while other countries' exhibits were on the east.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Colour lithograph, with some watercolour and varnish
Brief Description
Lithograph, The Stained Glass Gallery, from 'Dickinsons Comprehensive Pictures of the Great Exhibition of 1851', pub. Dickinson Brothers, 1854
Physical Description
West Indies - from Dickinson's comprehensive pictures of the Great Exhibition.
Dimensions
  • Height: 44.2cm
  • Width: 59.8cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 16/03/1999 by LH
Marks and Inscriptions
Signed and dated 'JN. 1852'
Gallery Label
British Galleries: As well as works of art and manufacture, a large number of natural resources were exhibited. These included minerals, fruit and vegetables. The aim was to show the visitor the variety and quality of colonial produce. This view includes the exhibits from New Zealand, the Bahamas, Australia, the Eastern Archipelago (Aegean sea), Trinidad and Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania).(27/03/2003)
Object history
This image is one from the Dickinson Brothers publication entitled 'Dickinsons Comprehensive Pictures of the Great Exhibition of 1851' of lithographs from the originals painted for Prince Albert.
Subject depicted
Summary
Object Type
Designed by Joseph Nash, this is one of the set of views published with accompanying text as Dickinson's Comprehensive Pictures of the Great Exhibition, exploiting the newly available technique of colour lithography. Nash was one of the more prolific artists working with this medium, whereby a picture is made by printing from a flat surface (traditionally stone, now often a metal plate), on which the artist draws or paints the original design with a greasy substance. The surface is next prepared, moistened and inked; the greasy printing ink adheres to the design, which is then printed onto a sheet of paper.

Historical Association
This view of the colonial exhibits shows that, as well as works of art and manufacture, a large number of natural resources were on display, including minerals, fruit and vegetables. The aim was to impress the visitor by the quality of colonial produce. The comparatively few artefacts on display emphasised the importance of these countries to Britain as sources of raw materials and as new markets for their manufactured goods. The official catalogue described Australia, for example, as 'the most extensive wool-producing country in the world', with valuable exports to Britain.

The British and colonial exhibits were grouped together in the western branch of the prestigious main avenue, while other countries' exhibits were on the east.
Collection
Accession Number
19536:12

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record createdJune 24, 2003
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