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Design drawing

  • Place of origin:

    Britain (made)

  • Date:

    1849 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    A.W. Pugin, born 1812 - died 1852 (artist)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Pencil

  • Museum number:

    D.831-1908

  • Gallery location:

    Prints & Drawings Study Room, level E, case MD, shelf 27

The Lismore Crozier, which is now in the National Museum, Dublin, was found in 1814 walled up in a tower of Lismore Castle which had been the residence of the Bishops of Lismore until the end of the 16th century. The inscription on the lower part of the crook and the top of the knop next to it records Niall Mac Meic Aeducain, who was Bishop of Lismore from 1090 to 1113, and Nectan the craftsman.

J.G. Crace worked for the 6th Duke of Devonshire at Chatsworth and was asked to decorate the main rooms of Lismore Castle. Pugin was reluctant to provide designs because he knew little about the family. He charged £20 for the set of drawings in 1850. It is probably that much of Pugin's detail was altered in execution. Crace supervised the work which took some time to complete. He provided furniture and fittings after Pugin's death.

Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (1812-52) is widely considered as one of the most significant and influential architects, designers and theorists of the 19th century. Following his conversion to Catholicism in 1835, he identified the Gothic style with Christian architecture and his work and writings inspired and framed the Gothic Revival. In 'Contrasts', published in 1836, he condemned classical forms and ardently praised 14th and 15th-century architecture. Pugin is best remembered for his work on the Palace of Westminster.

Physical description

Alphabet written out in medieval script, and a Latin inscription.

Place of Origin

Britain (made)

Date

1849 (made)

Artist/maker

A.W. Pugin, born 1812 - died 1852 (artist)

Materials and Techniques

Pencil

Marks and inscriptions

'+ Hoc Baculum pastorale factum est propter Nial Mac Mic Aeducain qui fuit Episcopus Lismore et obiit A.D. MCXII Nectan fuit operarius'

Dimensions

Height: 65 mm, Width: 544 mm

Object history note

The Lismore Crozier, which is now in the National Museum, Dublin, was found in 1814 walled up in a tower of Lismore Castle which had been the residence of the Bishops of Lismore until the end of the 16th century. The inscription on the lower part of the crook and the top of the knop next to it records Niall Mac Meic Aeducain, who was Bishop of Lismore from 1090 to 1113, and Nectan the craftsman.

Descriptive line

Alphabet written in medieval script for Lismore Castle; A.W.N. Pugin, 1849.

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Alexandra Wedgwood, A.W.N. Pugin and the Pugin Family , London; V&A, 1985, pp. 197 - 200.

Materials

Pencil

Techniques

Drawing

Subjects depicted

Alphabet

Categories

Designs; Drawings; Interiors

Collection

Prints, Drawings & Paintings Collection

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