Not currently on display at the V&A

Earrings

Earrings
1850-1899 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Earrings, in a wide variety of designs, were worn by women throughout the Islamic world. Plain heavy silver ones, like these, are typical of the traditional jewellery worn by the nomadic peoples of the Sahara. The polyhedral end, made from a cube with the corners cut off, is often found on bracelets and anklets as well as earrings, and is one of the most distinctive aspects of the jewellery worn on the southern edges of the Sahara, from the Red Sea to the Atlantic.

These were described as ‘Modern Egyptian’ when they were acquired by the Museum in 1904, and probably come from the extreme south of the country or the Sudan.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Earring
  • Earring
Materials and Techniques
Silver
Brief Description
Pair of silver hoop earrings with polyhedral terminals, Egypt, 1850-1899.
Physical Description
Pair of silver hoop earrings made from a strip of thick silver wire with a cube at one end with truncated corners.
Dimensions
  • ? diameter: 3cm
Credit line
Bequeathed by Edmond Dresden
Object history
Accessions register entry: 'Two rings of silver. / Penannular, one end terminating in a polyhedral knob. / Modern Egyptian / Each, diam. 1 1/4in.'
Summary
Earrings, in a wide variety of designs, were worn by women throughout the Islamic world. Plain heavy silver ones, like these, are typical of the traditional jewellery worn by the nomadic peoples of the Sahara. The polyhedral end, made from a cube with the corners cut off, is often found on bracelets and anklets as well as earrings, and is one of the most distinctive aspects of the jewellery worn on the southern edges of the Sahara, from the Red Sea to the Atlantic.



These were described as ‘Modern Egyptian’ when they were acquired by the Museum in 1904, and probably come from the extreme south of the country or the Sudan.

Collection
Accession Number
269&A-1904

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record createdApril 8, 2003
Record URL