Bangle

1850-1899 (made)
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Bracelets were part of the traditional costume in most Islamic cultures, and were always originally worn in matching pairs. Many of those made in Egypt were made of twisted wire, often intertwined in complex patterns, as here.

This example was described as ‘Modern Egyptian’ when it was acquired by the Museum in 1904. The realistic snake’s head and tail, and the catch on the back, are not typical of the traditional designs made for the nomadic Bedouin, and it may have been made for the urban population, or tourists.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Silver, braided and incised
Brief Description
Silver penannular bracelet of multiple braided wire with a snake's head and tail, Egypt, 1850-1899.
Physical Description
Penannular silver bracelet of triangular section made from a band of multiple braided wire, with the head of a snake at one end in solid metal, and the tail at the other. One eye of the snake is made from a circular mount for a missing stone. There is a small hook attached to the back of the tail which fastens in a ring on the back of the braided section.
Dimensions
  • Diameter: 6.4cm
Credit line
Bequeathed by Edmond Dresden
Object history
Accessions register entry: 'Bracelet of silver. / a flexible cable of treble-twisted wires, of triangular section, terminates in the head and tail of a snake, one eye of which is formed by a raised setting for a stone (missing). The fastening is by a hook at the tip of the tail and a loop below the neck. / Modern Egyptian / Diam (closed), 2 1/2 in.'
Subject depicted
Summary
Bracelets were part of the traditional costume in most Islamic cultures, and were always originally worn in matching pairs. Many of those made in Egypt were made of twisted wire, often intertwined in complex patterns, as here.



This example was described as ‘Modern Egyptian’ when it was acquired by the Museum in 1904. The realistic snake’s head and tail, and the catch on the back, are not typical of the traditional designs made for the nomadic Bedouin, and it may have been made for the urban population, or tourists.

Collection
Accession Number
298-1904

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdApril 8, 2003
Record URL