Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 53a

Dish

ca. 1765 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This dish was for serving food at a domestic dinner. It was probably intended for fruit or other sweet foodstuffs served during the dessert course.

Design & Designing
The Bow factory's engraver copied the figure scene from A New Book of Chinese Designs (1754). This was published by the engraver, designer and 'Professor of Ornament' Matthew (Matthias) Darly (1741-1780), together with the ornithologist George Edwards (1694-1773). It was reported in the Art Journal in 1869 that a personal copy of this book along with various papers associated with a Bow factory employee named John Bowcock were known to have survived together. The book has since disappeared and the papers scattered to private and public collections.

Materials & Making
The Bow factory made a type of porcelain strengthened with ashes from animal bones. The result was a comparatively durable ceramic material, one that was suitable for utilitarian wares. The factory made large quantities of inexpensively decorated porcelain, which was aimed at the middle-ranges of the market. Most of this was painted in underglaze blue, but some was overglaze printed, as here.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Soft-paste porcelain, transfer-printed in brown over the glaze and painted with enamels
Brief Description
Dish of soft-paste porcelain, transfer-printed over the glaze and painted with enamels, and oval with a lobed rim and wavy edge lined in brown, made by Bow Porcelain Factory, London, ca. 1765.
Physical Description
Dish of soft-paste porcelain, transfer-printed over the glaze and painted with enamels, and oval with a lobed rim and wavy edge lined in brown, and in the middle is a man approaching a games table at which a woman is seated, and on the rim are two smaller groups, one of a man, woman, and child, and the other of three children, all in pseudo-Chinese dress.
Dimensions
  • Width: 16.51cm
  • Length: 20cm
Dimensions checked: Registered Description; 01/01/1998 by KN
Gallery Label
British Galleries: The design on this dish was printed in outline and then painted over with enamel colours. This was a cheap method of reproducing coloured decoration. The painter did not need to be particularly skilful so could be paid a low wage.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Given by Charles Schreiber, Esq., MP, and Lady Charlotte Elizabeth Schreiber
Subjects depicted
Summary
Object Type
This dish was for serving food at a domestic dinner. It was probably intended for fruit or other sweet foodstuffs served during the dessert course.

Design & Designing
The Bow factory's engraver copied the figure scene from A New Book of Chinese Designs (1754). This was published by the engraver, designer and 'Professor of Ornament' Matthew (Matthias) Darly (1741-1780), together with the ornithologist George Edwards (1694-1773). It was reported in the Art Journal in 1869 that a personal copy of this book along with various papers associated with a Bow factory employee named John Bowcock were known to have survived together. The book has since disappeared and the papers scattered to private and public collections.

Materials & Making
The Bow factory made a type of porcelain strengthened with ashes from animal bones. The result was a comparatively durable ceramic material, one that was suitable for utilitarian wares. The factory made large quantities of inexpensively decorated porcelain, which was aimed at the middle-ranges of the market. Most of this was painted in underglaze blue, but some was overglaze printed, as here.
Bibliographic Reference
Beevers, David (ed.) Chinese Whispers: Chinoiserie in Britain 1650-1930, Brighton: The Royal Pavilion and Museums, 2008
Other Number
Sch. I 116 - Schreiber number
Collection
Accession Number
310:1-1889

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record createdApril 7, 2003
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