Panel thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 56c

Panel

1630-1690 (made)
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This panel is thought to have originally been part of a cabinet or screen made in Japan for the European market. Since lacquer had no natural equivalent in the West, Japanese lacquerware was always much in demand. This resulted in objects being cut up and reused when sections became damaged or when fashion changed. Although lacquerwork for the Japanese home market rarely depicted detailed figures, men and women dressed in kimono are often found on export products designed to appeal to Westerners.

Time
Japanese lacquerware was first shipped to Europe during the late 16th century and was quite unlike anything seen before. It was much admired and was imported in large quantities throughout the 17th century. Most European country houses and palaces possessed examples of Japanese export lacquer.

Places
High quality export lacquer was made to special order in Kyoto, Japan's former imperial capital. It was then transported to Deshima, a small island in Nagasaki harbour, for shipment abroad by Dutch merchants.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Wood, covered in black lacquer, with gold, black and red hiramaki-e and takamaki-e, inlaid with silver and gold foil and mother-of-pearl
Brief Description
Japanese Lacquer panel
Dimensions
  • Height: 22cm
  • Width: 65cm
  • Depth: 1.5cm
Dimensions checked: measured; 28/04/1999 by DW
Gallery Label
British Galleries: This panel depicts a picnic at cherry blossom time. Lacquer was highly prized by Europeans and scenes depicting figures were considered particularly exotic. This panel probably came from a cabinet or screen. After 1693 cheaper, Chinese lacquer was imported instead of Japanese lacquer. Existing pieces became highly desirable and were cut up and reused.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
The Salting Bequest
Object history
Made in Japan, for the European market
Production
For the European market
Summary
Object Type
This panel is thought to have originally been part of a cabinet or screen made in Japan for the European market. Since lacquer had no natural equivalent in the West, Japanese lacquerware was always much in demand. This resulted in objects being cut up and reused when sections became damaged or when fashion changed. Although lacquerwork for the Japanese home market rarely depicted detailed figures, men and women dressed in kimono are often found on export products designed to appeal to Westerners.

Time
Japanese lacquerware was first shipped to Europe during the late 16th century and was quite unlike anything seen before. It was much admired and was imported in large quantities throughout the 17th century. Most European country houses and palaces possessed examples of Japanese export lacquer.

Places
High quality export lacquer was made to special order in Kyoto, Japan's former imperial capital. It was then transported to Deshima, a small island in Nagasaki harbour, for shipment abroad by Dutch merchants.
Collection
Accession Number
W.181-1910

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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