Chair thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 54, Henrietta Street Room

Chair

1745-1765 (made), 1740-1750 (embroidered)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This chair is part of a set of six. It has an upholstered seat and back which are covered with embroidery in coloured wool on canvas ground, with a walnut frame. Its back and seat depict two different scenes.

Materials & Making
Needlework in wool on canvas was considered to be the most durable form of upholstered seat covering, and was sometimes made by the ladies of the house. Contemporary book illustrations were used as sources for the needlework patterns.

Subjects Depicted
The back shows a pastoral scene: two figures in fanciful costume with a cauldron. The seat shows a scene from Aesop's Fables: a crane thrusting its bill down the throat of a wolf (from 'The Wolf and the Crane').Further Information
Investigation of the under upholstery has revealed that the present 18th-century needlework did not originally belong to the chair. It was applied in the late 19th- or early 20th century. The chair legs originally had rimmed feet.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Walnut, veneered on beech; needlework in wool on linen canvas; modern case covers of wool serge, with cotton braid
Brief Description
canvas-work chair - one of a set of six
Dimensions
  • Height: 38cm
  • Width: 31cm
This print was originally part of a volume that was broken up into individual plates. Dimensions taken from departmental notes.
Gallery Label
British Galleries: These covers were probably put onto the chairs in the late 19th century but they are of a type that was used for fashionable drawing rooms, parlours and bedrooms throughout the first half of the 18th century. The embroidery might be done by professional workshops or by amateurs. Such seats were always provided with protective case covers, like these modern reproductions, in a cheaper and hardwearing fabric. These were only removed on special occasions.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Bequeathed by Lady Theobald. The conservation of the upholstery was generously funded by the Leche Foundation
Object history
Chairs made and covers embroidered in Britain
Summary
Object Type
This chair is part of a set of six. It has an upholstered seat and back which are covered with embroidery in coloured wool on canvas ground, with a walnut frame. Its back and seat depict two different scenes.

Materials & Making
Needlework in wool on canvas was considered to be the most durable form of upholstered seat covering, and was sometimes made by the ladies of the house. Contemporary book illustrations were used as sources for the needlework patterns.

Subjects Depicted
The back shows a pastoral scene: two figures in fanciful costume with a cauldron. The seat shows a scene from Aesop's Fables: a crane thrusting its bill down the throat of a wolf (from 'The Wolf and the Crane').Further Information
Investigation of the under upholstery has revealed that the present 18th-century needlework did not originally belong to the chair. It was applied in the late 19th- or early 20th century. The chair legs originally had rimmed feet.
Associated Objects
Collection
Accession Number
W.14-1938

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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