Not currently on display at the V&A

Hanging

1896 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This is a 'peasant tapestry' embroidered in linen. It was designed by Godfrey Blount and made at the Haslemere Peasant Industries in 1896. The Haslemere Peasant Industries was a community of artist craftspeople which was set up in Surrey in 1894 in an effort to obtain 'the double pleasure of lovely surroundings and happy work'. Ironwork, pottery, woodwork, fresco painting, hand-press printing, bookbinding, plasterwork and carving were all produced, but textiles were by far their most important crafts.

The first weaving sheds were set up by Joseph and Maud King who specialised in hand woven, plain and figured materials in linen, silk and cotton. From 1896 applique‚ embroideries, such as this example, were produced by the Peasant Arts Society founded by Godfrey Blount and his wife Ethel Hine. Local women were recruited for the workshops and trained in weaving and embroidery techniques.

Godfrey Blount had trained as a painter at the Slade School in London. He was keen to develop the rural ideal of Arts and Crafts philosophy and concentrated on the design of embroideries and hand-woven pile carpets also made by the Society. His designs for embroidered hangings use the simple but very effective technique of linen on linen with linear embroidery in linen thread. Peasant tapestries were designed for a number of different domestic purposes, including portisres, casement curtains and bed hangings. They became very fashionable in artistic circles and were sold through various shops. Heal's exhibited a set of bed hangings at the Paris Exhibition of 1900.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Linen, with linen appliqué and satin stitch edging in linen thread
Brief Description
Hanging, Surrey, England, 1896.
Physical Description
Hanging made from handwoven linen with a natural coloured background. Selvedges are used down the sides of the hanging and a turning of two inches on the top and three inches for the hem, each finished with a line of drawn thread work.

The design is applied in coloured linen and shows a tree with trunk and branches in mid green with the upper part of the foliage lying against a background of dark green linen. Onto this are applied five flowerheads in shades of dark pink, pink and peach. Around the trunk of the tree wind branches with five swallows in flight, worked in two shades of blue.

All the linen is applied with an edging of satin stitch in contrasting shades of linen thread.
Dimensions
  • Height: 210cm
  • Width: 180cm
  • Weight: 11.5kg (Note: Weight including pole.)
Gallery Label
British Galleries: The Haslemere Peasant Industries was started by a group of artists and designers in rural Surrey in 1894. Using local skills, they developing a wide range of artistic production including textiles. This panel, one of the so-called 'Peasant Tapestries', shows an original use of appliqu‚, a favourite technique with Arts and Crafts embroiderers.(27/03/2003)
Object history
Designed by Godfrey Blount (born in Bagshot, Surrey, 1859, died in Haslemere, Surrey, 1937) and made at the Haslemere Peasant Industries, Haslemere, Surrey.



Purchased at Sotheby's Belgravia, lot 90, 19 April 1978.
Summary
This is a 'peasant tapestry' embroidered in linen. It was designed by Godfrey Blount and made at the Haslemere Peasant Industries in 1896. The Haslemere Peasant Industries was a community of artist craftspeople which was set up in Surrey in 1894 in an effort to obtain 'the double pleasure of lovely surroundings and happy work'. Ironwork, pottery, woodwork, fresco painting, hand-press printing, bookbinding, plasterwork and carving were all produced, but textiles were by far their most important crafts.



The first weaving sheds were set up by Joseph and Maud King who specialised in hand woven, plain and figured materials in linen, silk and cotton. From 1896 applique‚ embroideries, such as this example, were produced by the Peasant Arts Society founded by Godfrey Blount and his wife Ethel Hine. Local women were recruited for the workshops and trained in weaving and embroidery techniques.



Godfrey Blount had trained as a painter at the Slade School in London. He was keen to develop the rural ideal of Arts and Crafts philosophy and concentrated on the design of embroideries and hand-woven pile carpets also made by the Society. His designs for embroidered hangings use the simple but very effective technique of linen on linen with linear embroidery in linen thread. Peasant tapestries were designed for a number of different domestic purposes, including portisres, casement curtains and bed hangings. They became very fashionable in artistic circles and were sold through various shops. Heal's exhibited a set of bed hangings at the Paris Exhibition of 1900.
Collection
Accession Number
T.173-1978

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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