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Dagger and sheath

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Credit Line:

    Given by Lady MacAlister

  • Museum number:

    M.1&A-1929

  • Gallery location:

    British Galleries, Room 56, The Djanogly Gallery, case 14 []

Object Type
In England during the early 17th century it was fashionable to call a certain type of dagger a 'Buckingham' dagger, since its popularity coincided with the ascendancy of George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592-1628), the favourite of James I. The cross-guard is usually of iron overlaid in silver and the grips are of wood. In this example, the blades of flat-diamond section are etched with Latin mottoes, a date and Tudor roses. Traces of gilding were found on the blade when it was recently cleaned.

Ownership & Use
Daggers in the 16th and early 17th centuries were usually worn 'en suite' with a sword, but by the 1630s they were carried separately. The leather sheath dated 1654 is a replacement for an earlier one and the pocket at the front would have carried a by-knife and a bodkin.

Historical Associations
By tradition this once belonged to Sir John Hotham. Deprived of his office as Governor of Hull by Charles I, he initially supported the Parliamentary cause but his ambitious nature soon brought him into conflict with leading Parliamentarians like Cromwell and Colonel Hutchinson. The 17th-century historian Lord Clarendon described him as being 'without any bowels of good nature or the least sense or touch of generosity'. Found guilty of intriguing with the Royalists, Hotham was beheaded in London in 1645.

Artist/maker

Unknown

Object history note

Said to have belonged to Sir John Hotham, Governor of Hull, executed in 1645

Descriptive line

Dagger with leather sheath

Labels and date

British Galleries:
Daggers needed sheaths to protect the blade from damage and the wearer from injury. Leather was a practical material for sheaths, as it was easily moulded after soaking, but withstood a lot of wear. [27/03/2003]

Categories

Arms & Armour; Europeana Fashion Project

Collection

Metalwork Collection

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