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Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C , Case O, Shelf 5, Box C

Print

1838 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This book consists of 20 sheets joined together to form 'Robins's Panoramic Representation of the Queen's Coronation Procession from the Palace to the Abbey, on 28th June 1838'.

Historical Association
Queen Victoria (1819-1901) was crowned when she was only 19 years old. Her youth and charm made her a monarch of unparalleled popularity. The formal state procession of the Coronation was therefore reintroduced, even at the extra cost of £26,000, so that the maximum number of people could see her. 400,000 people were said to have slept on the streets of the processional route the night before the Coronation. On the day itself, Queen Victoria wrote 'many as there were the day I went to the City, it was nothing - nothing, to the multitudes, the millions, of my loyal subjects who were assembled in every spot to witness the Procession. Their good-humour and excessive loyalty was beyond everything and I really cannot say how proud I feel to be the Queen of such a Nation.'

Subjects Depicted
On the outer cloth boards there is a gilt embossed image of 'The Queen's New Crown'. The young female monarch required a lighter crown than had been used by earlier monarchs. Its design, and incorporation of many of the most famous crown jewels, meant that it became the object of great public interest. This was further enhanced by its display in the shop window of the jewellers Rundell, Bridge & Rundell, in Ludgate Hill, London, where, free of charge, large crowds came to view it.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
colour lithograph, hand-coloured, in cloth boards, gilt decoration
Brief Description
Panoramic representation of Queen Victoria's coronation procession, June 1838; Lithographs, coloured by hand, of a folding panoramic view on 20 joined sheets; In cloth boards, with the title in gilt on the front cover, and a gilt crown on the back cover; Inside the covers, and on a sheet of paper, are the publisher's title and advertisements; Published by Joseph Robins, Bride Court, Fleet Street and C. Tilt, Fleet Street, London; 1838.
Physical Description
Lithographs, coloured by hand, of a folding panoramic view on 20 joined sheets of the Coronation Procession of Queen Victoria, June 1838. In cloth boards, with the title in gilt on the front cover, and a gilt crown on the back cover. Inside the covers, and on a sheet of paper, are the publisher's title and advertisements.
Dimensions
  • Height: 10.8cm
  • Closed width: 17.5cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 02/03/1999 by LH/KL The length when fully opened out is 298cm
Gallery Label
British Galleries: This panoramic view shows the processional route from Buckingham Palace to Westminster Abbey. The key along the bottom identifies specific people and landmarks. This would have been sold as an inexpensive souvenir of the event, but now serves as an important historical record.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Given by Dame Kathleen Courtney
Object history
Published by Joseph Robins and C. Tilt, Fleet Street, London
Subjects depicted
Summary
Object Type
This book consists of 20 sheets joined together to form 'Robins's Panoramic Representation of the Queen's Coronation Procession from the Palace to the Abbey, on 28th June 1838'.

Historical Association
Queen Victoria (1819-1901) was crowned when she was only 19 years old. Her youth and charm made her a monarch of unparalleled popularity. The formal state procession of the Coronation was therefore reintroduced, even at the extra cost of £26,000, so that the maximum number of people could see her. 400,000 people were said to have slept on the streets of the processional route the night before the Coronation. On the day itself, Queen Victoria wrote 'many as there were the day I went to the City, it was nothing - nothing, to the multitudes, the millions, of my loyal subjects who were assembled in every spot to witness the Procession. Their good-humour and excessive loyalty was beyond everything and I really cannot say how proud I feel to be the Queen of such a Nation.'

Subjects Depicted
On the outer cloth boards there is a gilt embossed image of 'The Queen's New Crown'. The young female monarch required a lighter crown than had been used by earlier monarchs. Its design, and incorporation of many of the most famous crown jewels, meant that it became the object of great public interest. This was further enhanced by its display in the shop window of the jewellers Rundell, Bridge & Rundell, in Ludgate Hill, London, where, free of charge, large crowds came to view it.
Bibliographic Reference
Victoria and Albert Museum Department of Prints and Drawings and Department of Paintings Accessions 1964 published by HMSO 1965
Collection
Accession Number
E.538-1964

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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