Coronation of William III and Queen Mary II thumbnail 1
Coronation of William III and Queen Mary II thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 54

Coronation of William III and Queen Mary II

Print
1689 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This is a type of print called an etching. An etching is produced by biting lines in a metal plate with acid. The lines are then filled with ink which is printed onto paper.

Subject Depicted
This print is a symbolic depiction of the coronation in 1689 of William III and Mary II. The royal couple are seated in the foreground of the picture in their coronation robes. On one side, a group of men pay homage to the newly crowned King and Queen. In the background, the coronation procession can be seen passing Whitehall Palace, London. From among the buildings rises the Banqueting House (1619-1625) by Inigo Jones, one of the earliest examples of classical architecture in England. The execution of Charles I had taken place on a scaffold outside the Banqueting House on the 30 January 1649.

The Dutch text surrounding the image lists the Kings and Queens of England and Scotland and the Princes of Nassau and Orange (the ruling family of The Netherlands). It therefore legitimises the claim of William and Mary to the British throne. This type of print, recording the triumph of the Protestant King and Queen over the exiled Roman Catholic monarch James II, conveys the importance of visual propaganda.

Ownership & Use
The print was intended for a Dutch market. Mary had spent her early adulthood at the Dutch court in The Hague, where she had been a popular figure. Her coronation and that of her husband would have been of great interest in Holland and people would have been keen to obtain images of such an important event.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Etching and letterpress
Brief Description
Print by Romayne de Hooghe, depicting an allegory of the Coronation of William III and Queen Mary, etching and letterpress, Amsterdam, ca. 1689

Physical Description
A black and white etching depicting the Coronation of William III and Mary II as King and Queen of England. Lettered around the edge with title, lists of the Kings and Queens of England and Scotland and the Princes of Nassau and Orange.
Dimensions
  • Height: 51.9cm
  • Width: 61.3cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 13/07/1999 by sp
Marks and Inscriptions
Lettered 'R. de Hooge fec. / C. Allard exc. cum Priv. / Tot Amsteldam, Gedrukt by karel Albard, Opden Heeren Staaten van Holland en West Friesland.'
Gallery Label
British Galleries: The Dutch supported the accession of William and Mary to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland, because it strengthened European Protestant opposition to the French Catholic king, Louis XIV (1638-1715). The leading Dutch engraver, Romeyn de Hooghe, showed events like the coronation in 1689 to an eager Dutch audience.(27/03/2003)
Object history
Etched in Amsterdam, The Netherlands by Romeyn de Hooghe (born in Amsterdam, 1645, died in Haarlem, The Netherlands, 1708); published in Amsterdam by Carel Allard (born in Amsterdam, 1648, still active in 1706).
Subjects depicted
Summary
Object Type
This is a type of print called an etching. An etching is produced by biting lines in a metal plate with acid. The lines are then filled with ink which is printed onto paper.

Subject Depicted
This print is a symbolic depiction of the coronation in 1689 of William III and Mary II. The royal couple are seated in the foreground of the picture in their coronation robes. On one side, a group of men pay homage to the newly crowned King and Queen. In the background, the coronation procession can be seen passing Whitehall Palace, London. From among the buildings rises the Banqueting House (1619-1625) by Inigo Jones, one of the earliest examples of classical architecture in England. The execution of Charles I had taken place on a scaffold outside the Banqueting House on the 30 January 1649.

The Dutch text surrounding the image lists the Kings and Queens of England and Scotland and the Princes of Nassau and Orange (the ruling family of The Netherlands). It therefore legitimises the claim of William and Mary to the British throne. This type of print, recording the triumph of the Protestant King and Queen over the exiled Roman Catholic monarch James II, conveys the importance of visual propaganda.

Ownership & Use
The print was intended for a Dutch market. Mary had spent her early adulthood at the Dutch court in The Hague, where she had been a popular figure. Her coronation and that of her husband would have been of great interest in Holland and people would have been keen to obtain images of such an important event.
Bibliographic Reference
Victoria and Albert Museum Department of Prints, Drawings and Paintings Accession Register for 1995
Collection
Accession Number
E.2939-1995

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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