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Papercut

Papercut

  • Date:

    1786 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Hunter, T. (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Cut-paper work on a blue ground

  • Credit Line:

    Given by Queen Mary

  • Museum number:

    E.115-1928

  • Gallery location:

    British Galleries, room 120, case 15, shelf DR3

  • Download image

Object Type
This copy of 'The Lord's Prayer' is an example of cut-paper work. Cut-paper work was a common pastime from the late 17th century, practised by the grandest in the country, from Queen Anne to Queen Victoria, while also being a folk art. Cut-paper work required time, patience and skill in the use of small scissors, knives and even pins. Devotional pieces such as this were popular, as were landscapes and flower arrangements.

Materials & Making
This example is made up of two pieces of cut-paper work. One is the oval piece of paper out of which the Prayer has been cut, probably using a small knife. The oval has been ruled in order to guide the artist in the size of the letters. The artist probably mis-cut the 'K' in 'Kingdom come', for a single cut letter 'K' has been stuck in from behind. Once the cutting of the letters was perfect, the oval was glued to the decorative border, which had been cut separately.

People
The work has been signed along the bottom in brown ink, 'cutt by T Hunter 1786', who was almost certainly a child. The cutting of 'The Lord's Prayer' would have been considered an appropriate occupation for a child, concentrating a young mind on a fundamental Christian text.

Date

1786 (made)

Artist/maker

Hunter, T. (maker)

Materials and Techniques

Cut-paper work on a blue ground

Marks and inscriptions

Inscribed in ink on the back 'cutt by T. Hunter 1786'

Dimensions

Height: 17 cm approx., Width: 14.3 cm

Object history note

Made by T. Hunter

Descriptive line

Cut paper design with the Lord's Prayer

Labels and date

British Galleries:
Prayers, such as the Lord's Prayer or the Creed, were popular subjects, reflecting the belief that handicrafts were morally worthy occupations. Finished cuttings were often fixed between panes of glass or mounted on mirror glass. [27/03/2003]

Production Note

Dated 1786

Categories

Christianity

Collection code

PDP

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Qr_O78129
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